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Archive for the ‘Skin Art’

New ART Skin Care System | Therapeutic-Grade Essential Oils03.27.19

ART Light Moisturizer (30ml)

Water, Isoamyl laurate, Glycerin, Behenyl alcohol, Betaine, Theobroma grandiflorum (Cupuacu) seed butter, Glyceryl stearate, Olea europaea (Olive) fruit unsaponifiables, Sodium stearoyl lactylate, Squalane, Lecithin, Lonicera caprifolium (Honeysuckle) flower extract, Lonicera japonica (Honeysuckle) leaf extract, Glycine soja (Soybean) sterols, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (Guar) gum, Dipotassium glycyrrhizate, Opuntia ficus-indica leaf cell extract, Sodium phytate, Xanthan gum, Santalum paniculatum (Royal Hawaiian Sandalwood) wood oil, Boswellia carterii (Frankincense) oil, Quillaja saponaria wood extract, Leucojum aestivum bulb extract, Orchis mascula flower extract, Polygonum aviculare extract, Tocopherol, Aloe barbadensis leaf juice, Benzyl alcohol (natural)

100% pure, therapeutic grade essential oil

ART Refreshing Toner (4 fl. Oz)

Water, Alcohol, Heptyl glucoside, Hamamelis virginiana (Witch hazel) water, Glycerin, Betaine, Mentha piperita (Peppermint) oil, Santalum paniculatum (Royal Hawaiian sandalwood) wood oil, Boswellia carterii (Frankincense) oil, Orchis mascula flower extract, Aloe barbadensis leaf juice, Camellia sinensis (Green tea) leaf extract, Lavandula angustifolia (Lavender) herb oil, Citrus limon (Lemon) peel oil, Melissa officinalis (Melissa) leaf oil

100% pure, therapeutic-grade essential oil

ART Gentle Cleanser (3.38 fl. oz)

Water, Disodium cocoyl glutamate, Coco-glucoside, Glycerin, Decyl glucoside, Polyglyceryl-4 caprate, Sodium cocoyl threoninate, Sodium cocoyl glutamate, Benzyl alcohol (Natural), Glyceryl oleate, Sodium levulinate, Sodium anisate, Sodium phytate, Boswellia carterii (Frankincense) oil, Santalum paniculatum (Royal Hawaiian Sandalwood) wood oil, Orchis mascula flower extract, Melissa officinalis (Melissa) herb oil, Citrus limon (Lemon) peel oil, Lavandula angustifolia (Lavender) oil

100% pure, therapeutic-grade essential oil

Contains corn, soy, and coconut/palm ingredients

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Fortnite| How to Draw Gingerbread Skin (Art Tutorial)02.19.19

Learn How to Draw the Gingerbread skin from Fortnite. Grab your paper, ink, pens or pencils and lets get started!I have a large selection of educational online classes for you to enjoy so please subscribe.

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Fortnite| How to Draw Gingerbread Skin (Art Tutorial)

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Melanoma Causes, Types, Symptoms & Treatment02.04.19

Melanoma Symptoms and Signs

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that forms in pigment-forming cells (melanocytes). (A mole, or melanocytic nevus, is a benign tumor of these pigment-forming cells.) Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. Rarely, melanomas can be found in other areas of the body that contain pigment-forming cells, including the eye, the tissues around the brain and spinal cord, or the digestive tract. Melanomas of the skin produce changes in the appearance of the skin, but these changes can sometimes be seen with other skin conditions. The characteristic symptoms include a change in an existing mole or new mole with asymmetric borders, uneven coloring, increasing size, scaling, or itching. Melanomas are typically not painful. It is always important to seek medical advice when you develop a new pigmented spot on the skin or have a mole that is growing or changing.

What is melanoma?

Melanoma is a cancer that develops in melanocytes, the pigment cells present in the skin. It can be more serious than the other forms of skin cancer because of a tendency to spread to other parts of the body (metastasize) and cause serious illness and death. About 50,000 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed in the United States every year.

Because most melanomas occur on the skin where they can be seen, patients or their spouses are often the first to detect suspicious tumors. Early detection and diagnosis are crucial. Caught early, most melanomas can be cured with relatively minor surgery.

This article is written from the standpoint of the patient. In other words, instead of describing the disease in exhaustive detail, the article focuses on answering the questions: “How do I know if I have melanoma?” and “Should I be checked for it?”

Guideline # 1: Nobody can conclusively diagnose him- or herself. If someone sees a spot that looks as though it is new or changing, he or she should show it to a doctor. When it comes to spots on the skin, it is always better to be safe than sorry.

Everybody gets spots on their skin. The older we are, the more spots we have. Most of these spots are benign. That means they are neither cancerous nor on the way to becoming cancerous. These may include freckles, benign moles, collections of blood vessels called cherry angiomas, or raised, irregular, pigmented bumps on the skin called seborrheic keratoses.

Guideline # 2: The vast majority of moles (melanocytic nevi) stay as moles and do not turn into anything else. Most melanomas do not arise in preexisting moles. For that reason, having all of one’s moles removed to “prevent melanoma” does not make sense.

Some people are born with moles (the medical name is “nevus,” plural “nevi”). Almost everyone develops them, starting in childhood. On average, people have about 25 moles, though some have fewer and others many more. Moles may be flat or raised, and they may range in color from tan to light brown to black. Moles may lose their color and end up flesh colored. It is unusual to develop new pigmented moles after age 35.

What does melanoma look like? What are melanoma symptoms and signs?

Guideline # 3: A changing spot may be a problem, but not every change means cancer. A mole may appear and then get bigger or become raised but still be only a mole. It is normal for many moles to start flat and dark, become raised and dark, and then later lose much of their color. This process takes many years.

Most public-health information about melanoma stresses the so-called ABCDEs:

These guidelines are somewhat helpful, but the problem is that many normal moles and other benign lesions of the skin are not perfectly symmetrical in their shape or color. Many spots, which seem to have one or more of the ABCDEs, are in fact just ordinary moles and not melanomas. Additionally, some melanomas do not fit this description but may still be spotted by a primary care physician or dermatologist. Not all melanomas have color or are raised on the skin. Amelanotic melanomas have little or no color may be confused with traumatized benign nevi or basal cell carcinoma. Desmoplastic melanoma may appear to be a thickened area of skin like a scar. As a rule, melanoma is not painful unless traumatized. They sometimes itch, but this has no diagnostic or prognostic importance.

What if the skin changes are rapid or dramatic?

Guideline # 4: The more rapid and dramatic the change, the less serious the problem.

When changes such as pain, swelling, or even bleeding come on rapidly, within a day or two, they are likely to be caused by minor trauma, often a kind one doesn’t remember (like scratching the spot while sleeping). If a spot changes rapidly and then goes back to the way it was within a couple of weeks, or falls off altogether, it is not likely to represent anything serious. Nevertheless, this would be a good time to say once again: Nobody can diagnose him- or herself. If one sees a spot that looks as though it is new or changing, show it to a doctor. If one see a spot that doesn’t look like one’s other spots, it should be evaluated.

What are the causes and risk factors for melanoma?

Guideline # 5: Individual sunburns do raise one’s risk of melanoma. However, slow daily sun exposure, even without burning, may also substantially raise someone’s risk of skin cancer.

Factors that raise one’s risk for melanoma include the following:

The presence of close (first-degree) family with melanoma is a high risk factor, although looking at all cases of melanoma, only 10% of cases run in families.

Having a history of other sun-induced skin cancers, such as the much more common basal cell or squamous cell carcinomas, indirectly raises one’s risk of melanoma because they are markers of long-term sun exposure. The basic cell type is different, however, and a basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma cannot “turn into melanoma” or vice versa.

How can people estimate their level of risk for melanoma?

The best way to know one’s risk level is to have a dermatologist perform a full body examination. That way one will find out whether the spots one has are moles and, if so, whether they are abnormal in the medical sense.

The medical term for such moles is atypical. This is a somewhat confusing term, because among other things the criteria for defining it are not clear, and it’s not certain that an atypical mole is necessarily precancerous. Patients who have lots of “atypical moles” (more than 24) do have a higher risk for developing melanoma but not necessarily within one of their existing funny-looking moles. It may be a challenge to find the “baby melanoma” in the middle of a back full of large, dark, or irregular moles. If someone has such moles, a doctor will recommend regular surveillance and may recommend biopsy of the most unusual or worrisome looking moles.

Sometimes, one learns at a routine skin evaluation that one does not necessarily need annual routine checkups. In other situations, a doctor may recommend regular checks at 6-month or yearly intervals.

What are the types of melanoma?

The main types of melanoma are as follows:

There are also other rarer forms of melanoma that may occur, for example, under the nails (subungual), on the palms and soles (acral lentiginous), uveal or choroidal (ocular), oral or other mucosal areas such as the vulva or penis, or sometimes even inside the body such as the brain.

What tests do health care professionals use to diagnose melanoma?

Most doctors diagnose melanoma by examining the spot causing concern and doing a biopsy. A skin biopsy refers to removing all or part of the skin spot under local anesthesia and sending the specimen to a pathologist for analysis. A small shave or punch biopsy which may be adequate for the diagnosis of other types of skin cancer is not the best for melanoma. To diagnose melanoma, the best biopsy is one that removes the entire extent of the visible tumor. Fine-needle aspiration may have a role in evaluating a swollen lymph node or a liver nodule but is not appropriate for the initial diagnosis of a suspicious skin lesion.

It is no longer recommended to do large batteries of screening tests on patients with thin, uncomplicated melanoma excisions, but patients who have had thicker tumors diagnosed or who already have signs and symptoms of metastatic melanoma may be recommended to have MRIs, PET scans, CT scans, chest X-rays, or other X-rays of bones when there is a concern of metastasis, blood tests of liver, and any other studies that will assist in staging (determining the extent of spread of the tumor).

The biopsy report may show any of the following:

Some doctors are skilled in a clinical technique called epiluminescence microscopy (also called dermatoscopy or dermoscopy). They may use a variety of instruments to evaluate the pigment and blood vessel pattern of a mole without having to remove it. Sometimes the findings support the diagnosis of possible melanoma, and at other times, the findings are reassuring that the spot is nothing to worry about. The standard for a conclusive diagnosis, however, remains a pathologic examination of a skin biopsy.

What are melanoma treatment options?

In general, early localized melanoma is treated by surgery alone. Doctors have learned that surgery does not need to be as extensive as was thought years ago. When treating many early melanomas, for instance, surgeons only remove 1 centimeter (less than inch) of the normal tissue surrounding the melanoma. Deeper and more advanced cancers may need more extensive surgery.

Depending on various considerations (tumor thickness, body location, age, etc.), the removal of nearby lymph nodes may be recommended. For advanced disease, such as when the melanoma has spread to other parts of the body, treatments like immunotherapy or chemotherapy are sometimes recommended. Many of these treatments are still experimental and, for that reason, their use may be limited to patients willing to participate in a research study.

An Internet search will name a variety of home remedies and natural products for the treatment of skin cancers, including melanoma. These include the usual topical and systemic antioxidants and naturopathic immune stimulators. There is no scientific data supporting any of these, and their use may lead to unnecessary delay in better established treatments, possibly with tragic results.

How do doctors determine the staging and prognosis (outlook) of a melanoma?

The most useful criterion for determining prognosis is tumor thickness. Tumor thickness is measured in fractions of millimeters and is called the Breslow’s depth. The thinner the melanoma, the better the prognosis. Any spread to lymph nodes or other body locations dramatically worsens the prognosis. Thin melanomas, those measuring less than 0.8 millimeters, have excellent cure rates, generally with local surgery alone. For thicker melanomas, the prognosis is guarded.

Melanoma is staged according to thickness, ulceration, lymph node involvement, and the presence of distant metastasis. The staging of a cancer refers to the extent to which it has spread at the time of diagnosis, and staging is used to determine the appropriate treatment. Stages 1 and 2 are confined to the skin only and are treated with surgical removal with the size of margins of normal skin to be removed determined by the thickness of the melanoma. Stage 3 refers to a melanoma that has spread locally or through the usual lymphatic drainage. Stage 4 refers to distant metastases to other organs, generally by spread through the bloodstream.

What is recurrent melanoma?

Recurrent melanoma refers to a recurrence of tumor at the site of removal of a previous tumor, such as in, around, or under the surgical scar. It may also refer to the appearance of metastatic melanoma in other body sites such as skin, lymph nodes, brain, or liver after the initial tumor has already been treated. Recurrence is most likely to occur within the first five years, but new tumors felt to be recurrences may show up decades later. Sometimes it is difficult to distinguish recurrences from new primary tumors.

What is metastatic melanoma?

Metastatic melanoma is melanoma that has spread beyond its original site in the skin to distant tissue sites. There are several types of metastatic melanoma. There may be spread through the lymphatic system to local lymph nodes. This may show up as swollen lymph glands (usually painless) or as a string of skin tumors along a lymphatic chain. Melanoma may also spread through the bloodstream (hematogenous spread), where it may appear in one or more distant sites, such as the lungs, liver, brain, remote skin locations, or any other body location.

What are the signs of symptoms of metastatic melanoma?

Signs and symptoms depend upon the site of metastasis and the amount of tumor there. Metastases to the brain may first appear as headaches, unusual numbness in the arms and legs, or seizures. Spread to the liver may be first identified by abnormal blood tests of liver function long before the patient has jaundice, a swollen liver, or any other signs of liver failure. Spread to the kidneys may cause pain and blood in the urine. Spread to the lungs may cause shortness of breath, other trouble breathing, chest pain, and continued cough. Spread to bones may cause bone pain or broken bones called pathologic fractures. A very high tumor burden may lead to fatigue, weight loss, weakness and, in rare cases, the release of so much melanin into the circulation that the patient may develop brown or black urine and have their skin turn a diffuse slate-gray color. The appearance of multiple blue-gray nodules (hard bumps) in the skin of a melanoma patient may indicate widespread melanoma metastases to remote skin sites.

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What are the treatments for metastatic melanoma?

Historically, metastatic and recurrent melanoma have been poorly responsive to chemotherapy. Immunotherapy, in which the body’s own immune system is energized to fight the tumor, has been a focus of research for decades. A variety of newer medications target different points in the pathways of melanoma cell growth and spread. While the most appropriate use of these medications is still being defined, the best treatment for melanoma remains complete surgical excision while it is still small, thin, and has not yet had a chance to spread.

Initial therapies to stimulate the immune system to help contain metastatic melanoma included infusions of interferon-alpha and interleukin-2 (both parts of the immune response to cancer and infection), and a few patients have responded to these therapies. There has, however, been an explosion recently in the approval of a number of targeted therapies that act on specific stages in the cell cycle, especially those of abnormal cells, and affect those growth processes of the tumor cells. Drugs that inhibit the kinase enzymes such as MEK, which is necessary for cell reproduction, include cobimetinib (Cotellic) and trametinib (Mekinist). Others target the signals for cell growth from abnormal BRAF genes and the enzymes they drive. Such medications in this family include dabrafenib (Tafinlar), vemurafenib (Zelboraf), and nivolumab (Opdivo). Pembrolizumab (Keytruda) blocks the tumor’s ability to inhibit T cell activity. Ipilimumab (Yervoy) works directly on the T-lymphocyte pathway to activate the immune system. Many of these medications are now being used in combination to get better therapeutic effects than they would by themselves. All of these medications have significant side effects, including some that are life-threatening, and are indicated only for stage 3 tumors to try to prevent recurrence and spread and stage 4 metastatic tumors that are no longer amenable to surgery.

What are the survival rates for metastatic melanoma?

Survival rates for melanoma, especially for metastatic melanoma, vary widely according to many factors, including the patient’s age, overall health, location of the tumor, particular findings on the examination of the biopsy, and of course the depth and stage of the tumor. Survival statistics are generally based on five-year survival rates rather than raw cure rates. Much of the success reported for the targeted therapies focuses on disease-free time because in many cases the actual five-year survival is not affected. It is hoped that combination therapy discussed above will change that.

What methods are available to help prevent melanoma?

What research is being done on melanoma?

Research in melanoma is headed in three directions: prevention, more precise diagnosis, and better treatment for advanced disease.

Where can people get more information about melanoma?

Medically Reviewed on 3/19/2018

References

Chae, Young Kwang, Michael S. Oh, and Francis J. Giles. “Molecular Biomarkers of Primary and Acquired Resistance to T-Cell-Mediated Immunotherapy in Cancer: Landscape, Clinical Implications, and Future Directions.” The Oncologist (2017): 1-12.

Mayer, J.E., S.M. Swetter, T. Fu, and A.C. Geller. “Screening, early detection, education, and trends for melanoma: current status (2007-2013) and future directions: Part I. Epidemiology, high-risk groups, clinical strategies, and diagnostic technology.” J Am Acad Dermatol 71.4 Oct. 2014: 599.e1-599.e12; quiz 610, 599.e12.

Mayer, J.E., S.M. Swetter, T. Fu, and A.C. Geller. “Screening, early detection, education, and trends for melanoma: current status (2007-2013) and future directions: Part II. Screening, education, and future directions.”J Am Acad Dermatol 71.4 Oct. 2014: 611.e1-611.e10; quiz 621-2.

Schadendorf, Dirk, et al. “Melanoma.” Nature Reviews: Disease Primers 1 (2015): 1-20.

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Nemean lion – Wikipedia02.04.19

The Nemean lion (; Greek: [1] Nemos ln; Latin: Leo Nemeaeus) was a vicious monster in Greek mythology that lived at Nemea. It was eventually killed by Heracles. It could not be killed with mortals’ weapons because its golden fur was impervious to attack. Its claws were sharper than mortals’ swords and could cut through any armor.

Today, lions are not part of the Greek fauna. The Asiatic lion subspecies formerly ranged in southeastern Europe. According to Herodotus, lion populations were extant in Ancient Greece, until around 100 BC when they became extinct.[2]

The lion is usually considered to have been the offspring of Typhon[3] (or Orthrus)[4] and Echidna; it is also said to have fallen from the moon as the offspring of Zeus and Selene, or alternatively born of the Chimera. The Nemean lion was sent to Nemea in the Peloponnesus to terrorize the city.

The first of Heracles’ twelve labours, set by King Eurystheus (his cousin), was to slay the Nemean lion.

Heracles wandered the area until he came to the town of Cleonae. There he met a boy who said that if Heracles slew the Nemean lion and returned alive within 30 days, the town would sacrifice a lion to Zeus; but if he did not return within 30 days or he died, the boy would sacrifice himself to Zeus.[3] Another version claims that he met Molorchos, a shepherd who had lost his son to the lion, saying that if he came back within 30 days, a ram would be sacrificed to Zeus. If he did not return within 30 days, it would be sacrificed to the dead Heracles as a mourning offering.

While searching for the lion, Heracles fetched some arrows to use against it, not knowing that its golden fur was impenetrable; when he found the lion and shot at it with his bow, he discovered the fur’s protective property when the arrow bounced harmlessly off the creature’s thigh. After some time, Heracles made the lion return to his cave. The cave had two entrances, one of which Heracles blocked; he then entered the other. In those dark and close quarters, Heracles stunned the beast with his club. During the fight the lion bit off one of his fingers. He shot arrows at it, eventually shooting it in the unarmoured mouth.

After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt, but failed. He then tried sharpening the knife with a stone and even tried with the stone itself. Finally, Athena, noticing the hero’s plight, told Heracles to use one of the lion’s own claws to skin the pelt.

When he returned on the thirtieth day carrying the carcass of the lion on his shoulders, King Eurystheus was amazed and terrified. Eurystheus forbade him ever again to enter the city; in the future he was to display the fruits of his labours outside the city gates. Eurystheus warned him that the tasks set for him would become increasingly difficult. He then sent Heracles off to complete his next quest, which was to destroy the Lernaean hydra.

The Nemean lion’s coat was impervious to the elements and all but the most powerful weapons. Others say that Heracles’ armour was, in fact, the hide of the lion of Cithaeron.

According to some authors, Heracles was helped in this labour by an Earth-born serpent, which followed him to Thebes and settled down in Aulis. It was later identified as the water snake which devoured the sparrows and was turned into stone in the prophecy about the Trojan War.[5]

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Digital Fantasy Art: Digital Art Techniques – Painting Skin01.28.19

Probably the most difficult part of any painting is the persons skin. It is quite a complicated subject which you could probably write a book on. I am certainly not an expert at it and I try to improve every time I start a new painting.

I am going to go over what I do and perhaps it will help you out of you are trying for something similar.

I actually have two different ways of painting skin so I will explain both and you can choose which one you like the best.

Technique 1 – Starting in black and white

The next stage is making your skin more realistic by putting other colours in there which are hard to see when looking. I always use references when painting but I do not usually stick to the colours they are. With a bit of trial and error you will get used to where the colours should go. It would be nice to say exactly what colour and where to put it but it is different every time you paint.

One easy way to get this stage without painting is use another tool from PS. Go to Image->Ajdustments->Colour Balance. This can change the colour of the shadows, midtones and highlights so it is pretty obvious what it does. So you are going to need to try a few things out here, e.g blue shadows and yellow highlights.

There are certain parts of the body that has lots of red in so choose a normal colour red and make sure the flow % is less than 5%, maybe even 1%. This means that when you paint very little of the paint will get on the skin..you only want a suggestion in most cases, not bright red. If you look below you can see some on her butt and shoulders – wherever the sun catches basically. Knees, Knuckles, Nose.

The skin is also reflective so when something colourful is next to it it will bounce off it. If you look carefully in places I have taken the colour right off the snake and put it into the skin. If the snake was green then you would see green reflecting off the womans skin. This goes for anything that is around the person, rocks, sky etc.

If the sky was bright blue and shiney you could use the same blue from the sky around highlights on the skin. One thing I learnt when painting skin is that the environment in which you place the person alters the skin considerably. So to make the skin look realistic it has to fit the colours that are around it and not just use the normal skin colours you expect.

Technique 2 – Starting in with colourThis is pretty similar to starting with grey but you need to make sure you choose the right colours from the start. You need to start with a set of at least three colours, dark, medium and light. If you do a google search for skin colours you will get plenty of sets to use rather than making your own.

Usually I use the grey technique now because it is easier to get the painting going and seeing what you have without worrying about colour. If you do too much colour on the person without touching the background you may have to redo a lot of the skin to match.

Either way it takes a lot of practice to learn where and how much of certain tones to use. Remember even though you want ‘colour’ into the skin such as blues and greens these colours are subtle and usually have a lot of grey in them too.

I do not think it is possible to read enough tutorials and help on skin so hopefully this page gives you at least one thing that helps. Good luck and let me know if you can improve any of the steps mentioned.

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Rash 101: The Most Common Types of Skin Rashes & Treatment01.26.19

Rash facts

What are the causes, symptoms, and signs of common types of noninfectious rashes?

Some common, noninfectious rashes are listed on the following pages. If you have a new rash and you have a fever or some other generalized illness associated with it, it would be best to see your doctor.

Some people may experience the following related rash symptoms and signs:

Atopic dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis, often called eczema, is a common disorder of childhood that produces red itchy, weeping rashes on the inner aspects of the elbows and in back of the knees as well as the cheeks, neck, wrists, and ankles. It is commonly found in patients who also have asthma and/or hay fever.

Seborrheic dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is the single most common rash affecting adults. It produces a red scaling often itchy eruption that characteristically affects the scalp, forehead, brows, cheeks, and external ears. In infants, it may involve and scalp (cradle cap) and diaper area.

Contact dermatitis

Contact dermatitis is a rash that is brought on either by contact with a specific chemical to which the patient is uniquely allergic or with a substance that directly irritates the skin. Some chemicals are both irritants and allergens. This rash tends to be weepy and oozy and affects the parts of the skin which have come in direct contact with the offending substance. Common examples of allergic contact dermatitis are poison ivy, poison sumac, poison oak (same chemical, different plant) and reactions to costume jewelry containing nickel.

Diaper rash

This is a common type of irritant contact dermatitis that occurs in most infants and some adults who wear diapers when feces and urine are in contact with skin for too long.

Stasis dermatitis

This is a weepy, oozy dermatitis that occurs on the lower legs of individuals who have chronic swelling because of poor circulation in veins.

Psoriasis

This bumpy scaling eruption which does not weep or ooze. Psoriasis tends to occur on the scalp, elbows, and knees. The skin condition produces silvery flakes of skin that scale and fall off.

Hives

These red itchy bumps come on in a sudden fashion and then resolve in about eight hours. They tend to recur frequently. If hives are caused by a drug, that drug should be avoided in the future.

Nummular eczema

This is a weepy, oozy dermatitis that tends to occur as coin-shaped plaques in the wintertime and is associated with very dry skin.

Drug eruptions

Certain drugs (like antibiotics) can produce a skin rash as an unwanted side effect. The common appearance is similar to rashes produced by certain common viral infections. On the other hand, drugs may produce a wide variety of other types of rashes.

Heat rash (miliaria)

This skin eruption is caused by the occlusion of sweat ducts during hot, humid weather. It can occur at any age but is most common in infants who are kept too warm. Heat rash looks like a red cluster of acne or small blisters. It is more likely to occur on the neck and upper chest, in the groin, under the breasts, and in elbow creases. Treatment involves moving the individual to a cooler environment.

Rashes not caused by infectious organisms, can be treated with over-the-counter 1% hydrocortisone cream for a week or so prior to seeking medical attention. Over-the-counter oral antihistamines like diphenhydramine (Benadryl) or hydroxyzine (Vistaril, Atarax) can be helpful in controlling the itching sensation.

What health care professionals diagnose and treat rashes?

Dermatologists, pediatricians, infectious diseases specialists, and many internists are capable of identifying most rashes.

How do health care professionals diagnose common skin rashes?

The term rash has no precise meaning but often is used to refer to a wide variety of red skin eruptions. A rash is any inflammatory condition of the skin. Dermatologists have developed various terms to describe skin rashes. The first requirement is to identify a primary, most frequent feature. The configuration of the rash is then described using adjectives such as “circular,” “ring-shaped,” “linear,” and “snake-like.” Other characteristics of the rash that are noted include density, color, size, consistency, tenderness, shape, and even temperature. Finally, the distribution of the rash on the body can be very useful in diagnosis since many skin diseases have a predilection to appear in certain body areas. Although certain findings may be a very dramatic component of the skin disorder, they may be of limited value in producing an accurate diagnosis. These include findings such as ulcers, scaling, and scabbing. Using this framework, it is often possible to develop a list, called a differential diagnosis, of the possible diseases to be considered. An accurate diagnosis of a skin rash often requires a doctor or other health care professional. On the basis of the differential diagnosis, specific laboratory tests and procedures can be conducted to identify the cause of a particular rash.

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Rashes produced by fungal infections

Fungal infections are fairly common. Yeasts are botanically related to fungi and can cause skin rashes. These tend to affect folds of skin (like the skin under the breasts or the groin). They look fiery red and have pustules (blisters) around the edges.

Fungus and yeast infections have little to do with hygiene — clean people get them, as well. Fungal rashes are not commonly acquired from dogs or other animals. They seem to be most easily acquired in gyms, showers, pools, or locker rooms, or from other family members. Many effective antifungal creams can be bought at the drugstore without a prescription, including 1% clotrimazole (Lotrimin, Mycelex) and 1% terbinafine (Lamisil). With extensive infection, or when toenails are involved, a prescription drug may be useful, such as oral terbinafine.

If a fungus has been repeatedly treated without success, it is worthwhile considering the possibility that it was never really a fungus to start with but rather a form of eczema. Eczema is treated entirely differently. A fungal infection can be independently confirmed by performing a variety of simple tests.

Rash due to parasites

One of the most common rashes from a parasite infection is scabies. Scabies is produced by a small mite (related to a spider). This mite is usually contracted by prolonged contact with another infected individual. The mite lives in the superficial layers of human skin. It does not produce symptoms until the host becomes allergic to it, which occurs about three weeks after the initial infection. It can resemble eczema. Bedbugs cause a series of eruptions where they pierce the skin.

Viral exanthems

Rashes that characteristically occur as part of certain viral infections are called exanthems. Many rashes from viruses are more often symmetrical and affect the skin surface all over the body, including roseola and measles. Sometimes certain viral rashes are localized to the cheeks, such as parvovirus infections (fifth disease). Other viral infections, including herpes or shingles, are mostly localized to one part of the body. Patients with such rashes may or may not have other symptoms like coughing, sneezing, localized burning, or stomach upset (nausea). Viral rashes usually last a few days to two weeks and resolve on their own.

What is the treatment for a rash?

Most rashes are not dangerous. Many rashes last a while and get better on their own. It is therefore not unreasonable to treat symptoms like itchy and/or dry skin for a few days to see whether the condition gets milder and goes away.

Nonprescription (over-the-counter) remedies include the following:

If these measures do not help, or if the rash persists or becomes more widespread, a consultation with a general physician or dermatologist is advisable.

There are many, many other types of rashes that we have not covered in this article. So, it is especially important, if you have any questions about the cause or medical treatment of a rash, to contact your doctor. This article, as the title indicates, is just an introduction to common skin rashes.

People with atopic dermatitis or eczema should not be vaccinated against smallpox, whether or not the condition is active. Patients with atopic dermatitis are more susceptible to having the virus spread on their skin, which can lead to a serious, even life-threatening condition called eczema vaccinatum. In the case of other rashes, the risk of medical complications is much less. Consult your doctor about the smallpox vaccine.

What is the prognosis for a rash?

The prognosis depends on the cause of the rash. An accurate identification is, therefore, of great importance in predicting its resolution.

Is it possible to prevent rashes?

If the cause of a particular rash is known it can be avoided. For example: a measles vaccination would be of great benefit in preventing the rash of measles, as well more serious consequences of measles infections.

Medically Reviewed on 8/3/2018

References

Bolognia, Jean L., Joseph L. Jorizzo, and Ronald P. Rapini. Dermatology, 2nd Ed. Spain: Mosby, 2008.

Rawlin, Morton. “Exanthems and Drug Reactions.” Australian Family Physician 40.7 July 2011: 486-489.

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Bandanas Skin Art – 30 Photos – Tattoo – 2603 Commercial …11.23.18

Specialties

Bandana’s helps you create custom tattoo art in a diverse and well executed fashion. Your comfort and satisfaction are our top priority. Old style to new, portraiture to watercolor washes your artist Bandana Mike can give you what you want. Check out the web site and give us a call.

Established in 1982.

Mike Staum aka Bandana MIke has been creating hand drawn artwork on skin since 1982. Mike an Artist from New Jersey moved with the Navy to Washington State in 1981. Loving the Scenery and the people kept me on the upper left coast. Being licensed in Washington and the State of Hawaii gives me the best of both worlds and the opportunity to continue to learn and grow my skills. If you think you know everything its time to quit and I’m not close to ready for that…. 31 years is just the beginning!

Degree in Technical Drafting/ Architecture from Middlesex County Voc/Tech

Degree in Visual Communications from Shoreline Community College

A lifetime of experimentation since before I can remember!

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SECOND SKIN: The Erotic Art of Lingerie: Patrice Farameh …08.01.18

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Events | THE SKIN ART07.22.18

Events | THE SKIN ART Dr. Nidhi S. Tandon was awarded the Health Icon Award 2018 in the field of Dermatology in U.P. by Times of India & Navbharat Times. She was facilitated by Honorable Deputy Chief Minister Dr. Dinesh Sharma. An event organised by FICCI FLO ( Lucknow Kanpur )and Chaired by Dr. Nidhi S. Tandon on Motherhood. The guest of honor was Padmabhushan Smt. Sharmila Tagore Ji Free Consultation & Treatments at IWAAF 2018 Organised by UP Tourism & FICCI FLO Ladies Organisation Dr. Nidhi S.Tandon being facilitated by Chief Minister of U.P Shri Yogi Adityanath Ji. Wonderful session at the skin art clinic on hair care by leading trichologist and hair transplant surgeon dr manjot MarwahThe main aim of the session was to educate about hair products and hair treatments .She covered topics like Shampoos conditioners , hair treatments for damaged hair and the best ways to get healthy hair. Thank You Dr manjot Marwah for sharing all information with our guests. FICCI FLO LkoDated : 10th May 17FICCI FLO Lko- Kanpur Chapter Organised a session on Skin Art & Anti ageing on 10th May 2017. Dr.Nidhi S.Tandon was the speaker at the event and she enlightened the guests with her knowledge on Skin Care & Anti ageing Treatments. Medical Director & Consultant Dermatologist of The Skin Art Clinic Dr. Nidhi S.Tandon exchanging knowledge about skin care & healthy skin with the students of Bhavya Kapurs Makeup Academy.Dated : 9th May 17

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Skin Art By Randy in Gastonia, NC 28054 | Citysearch07.07.18

Randy is the BEST tattoo artist around!! Randy gave me my 1st tattoo and I was VERY pleased. He is an amazing artist! After seeing the awesome detail in my tat…. even my DAD wouldn’t consider going anywhere else!! I highly recommend Skin Art by Randy in Gastonia to ANYONE. Regardless of the type you want. He can do detailed “pictures” and captures the faces outstandingly. He can do more “cartooned” tattoos too!! He is good at what he does and he takes pride in every peice of work he does….

I’ll put it this way… if Randy were to retire, I’d never get another tat!! He’s the only person that I’ll go to! Not to mention how incredibly CLEAN and STERILE his business is! I was VERY VERY happy with the one I have now and plan to get at least 2 more…… but ONLY BY RANDY!!!

THANKS RANDY!!!!!!!!

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