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Archive for the ‘Skin Art’

Have You Seen This – New York Times08.13.17

This feat of architectural engineering is part of the Shed, an art and performance space that will become the latest spectacle along New Yorks High Line. While the Shed wont be up and running for more than a year, it can now do this neat five-minute ballet on six-foot wheels.

When first announced, the project was vaguely conceived. Located where the High Line runs smack into the massive West Side development project called Hudson Yards, the Shed seemed hardly more than an architectural trophy, with no obvious reason for being, other than to appease a skeptical public with the promise of some cultural amenity on the site of one of the largest and most valuable real estate deals in New York.

Since then, an impresario named Alex Poots, formerly of the Manchester International Festival and the Park Avenue Armory, has taken over programming for the Shed and looks to be giving it a rationale. Well see, when the place opens in 2019.

Meanwhile the building, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell Group, is already taking shape: a six-story box, spooning with an apartment tower and encased inside that telescoping shell, which consists of an enormous steel exoskeleton of slender, crisscrossed columns, like Art Nouveau vines, supporting a feather-light, translucent-white polymer skin.

The gossamer-looking but gigantic structure still weighs in at 8 million pounds but glides on a half-dozen exposed steel bogies, or wheels, six-feet in diameter,

with tapered bearings so meticulously engineered that the system requires just six 15-horsepower motors

in effect, a Toyota Prius engine moving a behemoth as finely-tuned as a Formula One car.

In its scale, this faintly quaint, eloquently designed contraption aspires to conjure up the spirit of those 19th-century exemplars of elegant engineering like the Brooklyn Bridge or the Eiffel Tower: industrial-era monuments of structural form, both necessary and sufficient, ingenious but not space age, encapsulating the aspirations of a city.

One might also recall the classic photograph from 1857 of Isambard Brunel, the English engineer, dwarfed beside the launching chains of the S.S. Great Eastern.

When opened, the shell will drape over the Sheds sprawling plaza at Hudson Yards, which can then be made into a movie palace or a gallery for art or a theater with bleacher seats a flexible new 17,000 square foot public space for New York at what promises to be one of the citys busiest pedestrian intersections after all the commercial skyscrapers around it are built.

At the same time, the Sheds movable shell becomes a kind of kinetic sculpture, more aesthetic and functional than the clunky, pointless climbing gym that the sites developers have commissioned from Thomas Heatherwick, the gifted but unreliable British showman:

It is also more inspiring:

Whatever Mr. Poots ultimately cooks up, the shell alone bids to make the Shed a destination.

Videos: Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Images: Robert Howlett (Brunel); Timothy Schenck (highline view); Heatherwick Studio (Heatherwick building).

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Have You Seen This – New York Times

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The Farmer’s Skincare Magic – PaperCity Magazine (press release) (blog)08.13.17

A home garden may seem like an unlikely place to discover a skincare super ingredient, but for Farmacy co-founder Mark Veeder, his green thumb was the key to his budding skincare empire.

An avid gardner, Veeder was no stranger to the power of botany. So when he discovered a rare Echinacea plant in his home nursery, he knew the herbaceous flower would lead to something special. Turns out he was right. A few patents later, Farmacy was born in 2015 a skincare brand founded by Veeder and co-founder/farming expert Robert Beyfuss.

Together, the duo is combining Veeders trademarked Echinacea extract with natural botanicals and scientific research to create a one-of-a-kind, naturally-derived skincare line.

On a recent trip to Houston, we caught up with Veeder to talk all things Farmacy. From his green upbringing to the brands next move, heres an inside look at the farmer cultivated, scientist activated beauty brand.

While in my garden at home, I noticed a green-flowering Echinacea purpurea plant. I knew that this was unique, since there was no such thing as a green-flowering Echinacea, and went ahead and got it patented, Veeder says.

It turns out that our Echinacea Echinacea GreenEnvy is 300 percent stronger in a phytochemical called Cichoric Acid, which has incredible skincare benefits because it is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory.

I partnered with a leading lab in New Jersey to develop a full line of products. At Farmacy, we say were Farmer Cultivated, Scientist Activated because we believe in using incredible botanicals backed by the power of science to create naturally-derived, efficacious products.

When I was a kid, instead of looking at fashion magazines, I was looking at plant catalogs. Ive always had both a love and respect for nature and farming from a young age (I grew up on my dads Christmas tree farm), and that passion is something that has carried with me throughout my life.

My curiosity about plants and botanicals plays a large role in Farmacys product development, since beyond my discovery of Echinacea GreenEnvy, Im always on the hunt for new, unique actives that I can bring into skincare.

A lot of people are familiar with taking Echinacea when theyre feeling sick, or have a cold, because its loaded with antioxidants. It has a similar effect when applied topically to the skin.

Our patent-protected variant of Echinacea Purpurea, GreenEnvy, contains a high concentration of Cichoric Acid,which is a potent natural antioxidantand anti-inflammatory that helps protect and firm the skin by inhibiting the enzymes that break down collagen.

[It]also normalizes the skin pigmentation process to promote a more evenly toned complexion.

Our newest launch which just came out in July is our Honey Drop Lightweight Moisturizer. Its a long-lasting, lightweight moisturizer combining Echinacea GreenEnvy Honey (which is made only by the bees on our farm in Upstate New York), Triple Hyaluronic Acid Complex (to target the skin at three different molecular weights) and cupuau butter beads which melt into the skin to provide a smooth, hydrated finish.

As part of our mission to foster an appreciation for naturally derived and farmer cultivated ingredients and bring attention to the importance of honeybees to our food supply, were donating one dollar for every honey product sold through December 2017 toCity Growersfor the development of their Bee Education program.

City Growersis a nonprofit with the mission to close fundamental gaps in the experiences of city kids: exploration of the natural world and understanding of where our food comes from.

Its a combination of Invincible Root Cell Anti-Aging Serum because its such a powerful and active formula that reduces inflammation, evens out skin tone and promotes collagen production; and our New Day Gentle Cleansing Grains, which are gentle enough to use every day. And they dont strip your skin, but rather leave it cleansed and hydrated.

I continue to be an obsessive gardener and will always be! My gardening is my art. Some paint with pigments and paints, while I paint with plants.

Its how I stay grounded and connected to the earth and present every day. I love growing all kinds of plants but of course, my Echinacea GreenEnvy is my all-time favorite plant to grow.

Originally posted here:
The Farmer’s Skincare Magic – PaperCity Magazine (press release) (blog)

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Where mastectomy scars raged, a tattoo garden blooms – 89.3 KPCC08.12.17

Within weeks of being diagnosed with breast cancer at 29 years old, Nicole O’Hara of Phoenix, Md., underwent a double mastectomy. She had breast reconstruction during the same operation; then it was on to chemotherapy.

The ordeal left O’Hara with “big, ugly, red inflamed scars and stitches and drains,” she says.

“It [was] a battlefield.”

The scars spread across her chest where the incisions were made and the chemo port was placed. As she healed at home, those scars remained.

“To be reminded of those every time you look in the mirror can be hard,” she says. “You’re trying to move past that point in your life.”

O’Hara’s plastic surgeon laid out the reconstruction options: She could have nipples built from her own skin or areola and nipple shading tattooed to look like the real thing. But instead of re-creating what she had lost, she decided to do something more artistic.

She worked with a friend to design a tattoo and, four years after the mastectomy surgery, took it to Lisa Doll, the owner of Rose Red Tattoo in Ellicott City, Md. Doll specializes in tattooing over scar tissue that is often discolored, uneven and thinner than normal skin, making it difficult to hold pigmentation. The skin typically needs at least a year to heal before it’s ready. And even then, scarring may be too extensive.

But a tattoo can be an empowering option for people who have had a mastectomy, Doll says.

“Cancer comes through and does things that they’re not happy with,” she says. “Getting a tattoo over their mastectomy scars puts them in control of their body image.”

Doll’s first mastectomy tattoo client came to her through word of mouth. It was an emotional experience and motivated her to want to do more. Since then, she has been active in the breast cancer community, booking clients every month.

“People see it much more as an adornment to their body. It doesn’t have that taboo undertone like it used to,” she says. “They bring their whole family to see the results.”

The art requests range from floral and ornamental to the more risque and lacy, but Doll says that the designs almost always have some personal meaning.

Like the piece O’Hara has tattooed across her chest: a spray of apple blossoms, bluebells, heather, garlic all symbols from her garden. A black and blue magpie sits off to the right with his wings outstretched.

“I’m a gardener,” she says, “Flowers, birds it’s where I feel most alive and comfortable.”

She specifically asked for tall lavender lupine flowers to extend up her shoulder in a bra-strap shape so she could tell her story to anyone who happened to see it.

“It’s a reminder that yes, I got through it. I made it.”

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Where mastectomy scars raged, a tattoo garden blooms – 89.3 KPCC

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VIDEO: Where Mastectomy Scars Raged, A Tattoo Garden Blooms – NPR08.12.17

Within weeks of being diagnosed with breast cancer at 29 years old, Nicole O’Hara of Phoenix, Md., underwent a double mastectomy. She had breast reconstruction during the same operation; then it was on to chemotherapy.

The ordeal left O’Hara with “big, ugly, red inflamed scars and stitches and drains,” she says.

“It [was] a battlefield.”

After Nicole O’Hara was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 29, she had a double mastectomy. The surgery left her with scarring that she decided to cover with an artistic tattoo. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

After Nicole O’Hara was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 29, she had a double mastectomy. The surgery left her with scarring that she decided to cover with an artistic tattoo.

The scars spread across her chest where the incisions were made and the chemo port was placed. As she healed at home, those scars remained.

“To be reminded of those every time you look in the mirror can be hard,” she says. “You’re trying to move past that point in your life.”

O’Hara’s plastic surgeon laid out the reconstruction options: She could have nipples built from her own skin or areola and nipple shading tattooed to look like the real thing. But instead of re-creating what she had lost, she decided to do something more artistic.

She worked with a friend to design a tattoo and, four years after the mastectomy surgery, took it to Lisa Doll, the owner of Rose Red Tattoo in Ellicott City, Md. Doll specializes in tattooing over scar tissue that is often discolored, uneven and thinner than normal skin, making it difficult to hold pigmentation. The skin typically needs at least a year to heal before it’s ready. And even then, scarring may be too extensive.

O’Hara’s tattoo required three sessions with Lisa Doll to complete the line work and color shading. Doll says that clients “get these tattoos to represent things about themselves. It becomes an empowering thing for them, an expressive thing.” Meredith Rizzo and Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

O’Hara’s tattoo required three sessions with Lisa Doll to complete the line work and color shading. Doll says that clients “get these tattoos to represent things about themselves. It becomes an empowering thing for them, an expressive thing.”

But a tattoo can be an empowering option for people who have had a mastectomy, Doll says.

“Cancer comes through and does things that they’re not happy with,” she says. “Getting a tattoo over their mastectomy scars puts them in control of their body image.”

Doll says that tattooing isn’t as taboo as it once was. Some post-mastectomy clients bring their whole family to support them. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

Doll says that tattooing isn’t as taboo as it once was. Some post-mastectomy clients bring their whole family to support them.

Doll’s first mastectomy tattoo client came to her through word of mouth. It was an emotional experience and motivated her to want to do more. Since then, she has been active in the breast cancer community, booking clients every month.

“People see it much more as an adornment to their body. It doesn’t have that taboo undertone like it used to,” she says. “They bring their whole family to see the results.”

The art requests range from floral and ornamental to the more risque and lacy, but Doll says that the designs almost always have some personal meaning.

Like the piece O’Hara has tattooed across her chest: a spray of apple blossoms, bluebells, heather, garlic all symbols from her garden. A black and blue magpie sits off to the right with his wings outstretched.

“I’m a gardener,” she says, “Flowers, birds it’s where I feel most alive and comfortable.”

She specifically asked for tall lavender lupine flowers to extend up her shoulder in a bra-strap shape so she could tell her story to anyone who happened to see it.

“It’s a reminder that yes, I got through it. I made it.”

Continued here:
VIDEO: Where Mastectomy Scars Raged, A Tattoo Garden Blooms – NPR

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Photographer captures the faces of people with vitiligo to help her embrace her own skin – Metro08.12.17

Jasmine Colgan has learned to love her vitiligo through photography. (Picture: Jasmine Colgan / mediadrumworld.com)

Jasmine Colgan hasnt always loved her vitiligo, a condition which causes white patches across her skin.

She first noticed light patches on her wristswhen she was 21-years-old. Those patches began to spread, Jasmine headed to the dermatologist, and it was confirmed that she had vitiligo.

When I was studying my undergrad at the University of Colorado in Denver, my friend took a photograph of my hands, Jasmine says.

I couldnt stop looking at the picture.

I remember taking a few hours a day to match my skin tones evenly. Around lunchtime my lips would have rubbed off.

It was photography that helped her to learn to view the beauty of her skin.

One day, she scrubbed off her makeup and began to take self-portraits, using her skin as a form of art.

It became a relieving experience to express my emotions and capture them in a still life, she said.

As I shared my images, they showed my insecurities and somehow connected me with myself.

Jasmine began using makeup to enhance her vitiligo, rather than hide it.

Keen to carry on that mission of self-love and acceptance, she created a new project, called Tough Skin, to capture people from around the world living with vitiligo.

The idea for the name of Tough Skin came from my late grandmother when I was diagnosed, Jasmine explains. She told me, you gotta have tough skin, so I shortened the name for the project.

I have always been a documentation photographer, so I incorporated the idea of close shots with my skills.

I wanted to go to experience [peoples] culture of living with vitiligo, and I believe the only way to do that is to be in each persons environment.

I love the whole idea. Ive always wanted to travel, but this gives it a whole new meaning.

Jasmine began travelling the world, documenting people with vitiligo as she went.

The experience has helped Jasmine to love her own skin even more.

We share an unspoken bond, its heart-warming, she says. Just to be in the presence of someone with vitiligo.

A lot of the meetings have tears, but lately it has been mainly smiles.

A lot of hugs go on at meetings, which is my favourite because, I love hugs.

My favourite common thing that we all talk about is, where was your first spot, such an easy conversation starter and everyone has a different location, a different spot and a different experience.

So, when I arrange a meeting and a large group joins, its wonderful to hear the comparisons and contrasts of our similar yet so different skin.

She hopes that the photo series will work towards reducing the nasty comments people with vitiligo so often receive, as well as encouraging those with the skin condition to see their skin as beautiful.

When I was coaching gymnastics, the young girls called me a cow and asked why I was different, Jasmine explains.

With teenage adults, I catch them staring and Ill wave and smile just to show them that Im friendly and not contagious, vitiligo is probably something theyve never seen before.

Ive noticed that if they continue to stare or awkwardly look away after Ive waved and smiled it upsets me. Please ask questions, your eyes are more painful than the words.

Ignorant comments can hit you, left and right.

She hopes to expand her project to include everyone with an outer difference, whether its albinism, cleft lip, cerebral palsy, or downs syndrome.

And to those who look different, Jasmine has some words of strength.

Do not let the words hurt you, it is ok to stand up for yourself.

No matter the age of the person. Educate them on what they do not understand. Embrace your skin because you deserve to and you are beautiful.

We are all beautiful.

MORE: Black grandma whose vitiligo is slowly turning her white shows that beauty is beyond skin

MORE: Photographer gives birth in a parking lot after getting stuck in traffic

MORE: Stunning photo series will make you want to grow out your armpit hair

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Photographer captures the faces of people with vitiligo to help her embrace her own skin – Metro

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Denver photographer captures the beauty of vitiligo – Gears Of Biz08.11.17

A photographer living with vitiligo is showcasing the beauty of those living with the skin condition in a series of incredible pictures.

The series of intimate shots capture people from all walks of life standing proudly with vitiligo. Among the close-up pictures, a man can be seen laughing, while a young boy smiles and another man bares his arms, face and neck for the camera.

Jasmine Colgan, 27, took the pictures as part of one of her projects, entitled Tough Skin. The photographer, from Denver, Colorado, first noticed light patches on her wrists when she was 21 years old.

Soon after, the patches began to spread and a dermatologist confirmed that she had vitiligo.

Initially, Colgan was afraid of how she would look as her skin changed color, but decided to embrace it after realizing her skin tone could be a work of art.

When I was studying my undergrad at the University of Colorado in Denver, my friend took a photograph of my hands and showed me and I couldnt look away from the picture, she said.

It was the first time that I was able to see art in my skin. I remember taking a few hours a day to match my skin tones evenly but around lunch time, my lips would have rubbed off.

So, I took off my make-up one day and I started to photograph myself with my camera. To create my own art and use my skin as my medium.

It became a relieving experience to express my emotions and capture them in a still life. As I shared my images, they showed my insecurities and somehow connected me with myself.

Now, the photographer still wears make-up, but she uses three different shades to showcase her vitiligo even more instead of trying to even out her skin tone.

As she turned the lense onto others living with the condition, Colgan decided to travel to meet her subjects and get a feel of their lives.

The idea for the name of Tough Skin came from my late grandmother when I was diagnosed. She told me, You gotta have tough skin so I shortened the name for the project, Colgan said,

I have always been a documentation photographer, so I incorporated the idea of close shots with my skills. As for traveling, I wanted to go to experience their culture of living with vitiligo, and I believe that the only way to do that is to be in each persons environment.

I love the whole idea. Ive always wanted to travel, but this gives it a whole new meaning.

I want to broaden the meaning of Tough Skin, to everyone who has an outer difference, for example, albinism, cleft lip, downs syndrome, cerebral palsy. We are all beautiful.

Colgan has acrofacial vitiligo, which tends to occur away from the center of the body. Her family and friends gave her strength and helped her remain positive when she was first diagnosed with the skin condition.

When out and about, Colgan receives mixed reactions from the public but said she often feels close to other people living with vitiligo.

We share an unspoken bond, its heartwarming. Just to be in the presence of someone with vitiligo, she added.

A lot of the meetings have tears, but lately it has been mainly smiles. A lot of hugs go on at meetings, which is my favorite because, I love hugs.

My favorite common thing that we all talk about is Where was your first spot? Such an easy conversation starter, and everyone has a different location, a different spot and a different experience.

So, when I arrange a meeting and a large group joins, its wonderful to hear the comparisons and contrasts of our similar yet so different skin.

Over the years, Colgan has sometimes struggled to cope with peoples reactions to her changing skin tone.

Honestly, the reactions from people who I havent seen in years are the hardest, they ask what happened to me or just dont recognize me, she said.

When I was coaching gymnastics, the young girls called me a cow and asked why I was different.

With teenage adults, I catch them staring and Ill wave and smile just to show them that Im friendly and not contagious, vitiligo is probably something theyve never seen before.

Ive noticed that if they continue to stare or awkwardly look away after Ive waved and smiled it upsets me. Please ask questions, your eyes are more painful than the words.

Ignorant comments can hit you, left and right. Do not let the words hurt you, it is OK to stand up for yourself.

No matter the age of the person. Educate them on what they do not understand. Embrace your skin because you deserve to and you are beautiful.

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Denver photographer captures the beauty of vitiligo – Gears Of Biz

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Live with the arts – The Daily Post-Athenian08.11.17

The following is an essay I wrote six and a half years ago, while in graduate school, just over two years before I was hired as executive director for Athens Area Council for the Arts. Reflecting on a story about the power of live music, I recalled this piece. The writer at the time was preparing for a career in corporate communications. If you’d have asked her then, she never would have guessed she’d end up building a life in her hometown and a career as an arts administrator:

Elation. What I felt, at eighteen, hips bumpin’ in that hippie sway, soul jumpin’ right out of my skin. October 2004, Tremont Music Hall, Charlotte, North Carolina. The front-man lifts his right hand from the pedal steel long enough to aim his long pointer finger directly at my beating heart. “My stage is a ladies stage,” he beckons, oozing swagger, “You three – on up here.” Screaming in that distinctive college-girl squeal, we clamor over shoulders, boosted by our (uninvited) male counterparts. Bright lights, stage right. For seven celebrated minutes we’re backup singers. Tambourine and all. What song was it? My memory thwarts that detail. Perhaps it wasThree Little Birds; more likely,Is this Love? Oh yes, it was love I was feeling, and rapture, and “Good God, my God don’t ever let this moment die.” We told Robert his invitation was serendipitous, “It’s her eighteenth birthday!” We jumped, still squealing, pointing at Erin and made our exit as the crowd sang “Happy Birthday, Dear Erin,” led by Robert Randolph and the Family Band.

Euphoria. What I felt, at twenty-one, feet stompin’ in that percussive sashay, soul jumpin’ right outta my skin. June 2008, Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival, Manchester, Tennessee. The unforgiving sun beats down, punishing forgotten grass. Fickle rays; they kiss my cheeks but char my shoulders, crisp my ears. No matter, we pay no mind. The diminutive diva’s cherry sequins quake like Cabasa beads. “Now, you sweatin’, I see you sweatin’. I’m sweatin’, you see me sweatin.’ But, you see me movin’, you seeme groovin’, you see me feelin’, you see me shakin’.” (Trumpets crescendo.) “You see me shakin’.” (Trombone blasts.) “You see me shakin!” (Brass blares.) “Now shake!” (Brass blasts.) “Now Shake!” (Brass blares.) “Everybody shake!” (Brass blasts.) Three thousand strong and counting shake and shudder, we breathe in time to the drum beat. We’ve transcended. Where are we? A farm in Middle Tennessee, authenticity says. But fancy says, no, 1972, New Orleans. Or nowhere. Nowhere but here: no time but this moment. Me, Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings, him, Bubba from Alabama, and the woman who calls herself Janis. Our feet keep us grounded, the bass rhythm gets us lifted.

Ecstasy. What I felt, at twenty four, head noddin’ in that harmonious sentiment, soul jumpin’ right outta my skin. February 2011. Sue E. Trotter Theater. Athens, Tennessee. The folk guitarist has us wrapped around his long string-pickin’ finger. Five of them saunter over six strings, he sings, and we’re his. A self-proclaimed cross between Pete Seeger and Chris Rock, Vance Gilbert’s whimsical humor pairs perfectly with his soul-wrenching tenor tone.

He has us laughing with “My Bad.” “Now imagine they brought Billie Holiday back from beyond,” he says, setting the scene, “and they want her to do Jazz. Not Jazz like she used to but Jazz for the kids, you know, relevant. They fill a room with, you know, Taylor Swift, and Rihanna, and Jay-Z, and Justin Timberlake, and Beyonce, and Kanye West (they just don’t let him have the mic) and they tell ’em to write a song, for Billie, forrelevantJazz. “My Bad,” the product of this pretend writing session, is an uproarious parody – “I know tappin’ that was wack, my bad.” He has us swaying with his covers and chameleon croon. He’s “Lady Day” with a mournful cry, he’s Neil Young with a mocking warble, he’s “Satchmo” with a smiling mouthful of gravel. He breathes life into Joni Mitchell and conjures Jimi Hendrix. He has us crying with his sentimental authenticity. His originals are as genuine as they are beautiful: “Unfamiliar Moon,” bemoans everyday melancholy, “Old Man’s advice,” commemorates distinctive relationships, “Some Great Thing,” celebrates just that in every moment, and “Lucia’s Lullaby,” an impromptu encore improvisation addressed to the brown-eyed toddler in the front row confirms his brilliance.

Where were we, again?Athens, Tennessee. Musical grandeur is ready and waiting at your local Arts Center. I’ve spent years out-of-town, living the big-city-girl high life, in Charlotte, then Nashville. I’ve seen shows in Atlanta, New York and Chicago to name a few. I’m back home again for a few months. I have friends in similar situations. We joke and tease one another and lament the lack of things to do. “What is there for twenty-somethings in this town?” is our sort of mantra. We forget that we have a unique artistic venue at our fingertips. Athens Area Council for the Arts’ Black Box Concert Series produces shows that rival those I’ve attended in “big cities.” AACA also provides the opportunity to experience and create visual art: the exhibits feature local and national artists, the Art Market showcases the work of local artisans, and art classes allow you to embrace your inner artist. The Athens Community Theater also presents an opportunity to engage in the Arts, whether you want to audition for a center-stage role, or laugh and enjoy the show from the audience.

Don’t regret your small town life.Livewith your arts community.

*

EDITOR’S NOTE: Lauren Shepherd is executive director of the Athens Area Council for the Arts. Learn more at athensartscouncil.org

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Live with the arts – The Daily Post-Athenian

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The Art Behind NBA 2K18 weirdly chooses to showcase, uh, stretch marks – App Trigger08.11.17

NBA 2K18is the latest entry in the acclaimedNBA 2Kseries. Today, the team decided it needed to make its own headlines given the competitionhas been making headlines for its own landmark decisions. So what did Visual Concepts and 2K studios want to show off? Stretch marks!

Look at them! Sitting there in that shoulder joint staring right back at ya. Remember when video games didnt show stretch marks and you really wanted to see them? Well, now they have appeared the same way Lebrons hairline emerged after being nonexistent for a decade.

Oooh yeah! Give me some more stretch marks and imperfectgoodness. What else you got for meNBA 2K18? How about some healed over elbow scars?

Mmmmph. Maybe even some pock marks and varying skin tones on the face!

YASSSSSS queen! Thats what were looking for!

In other news,NBA 2K18will feature more shoes, arm sleeves, wrist snaps, knee braces, and other accessories than ever before. Additionally, the team made their way up tothe NBA headquarters to get color scans of all of the brand new Nike jerseys which are being reworked.

These new jerseys are also being designed with new cloth physics to cater to the fact they are more slimming and fit tighter around the body while players are playing.

Last, but not least, the MyPlayer appearance creator has received an overhaul to allow for greater variation in the players you create. You get access to even more hairstyles and facial appearance selections.

They even overhauled the way the system treats and showcases weight in the game with a new height and weight slider to give you greater leverage in the various sizes of players you create inNBA 2K18.

All of this being said,NBA 2K18is once again looking like it will be the best-looking representation of NBA basketball on a video game console or PC this fall. It is great the artists at 2K Sports continue to push themselves further and further in the chase for photorealism.

I cannot write this article without talking about the complete elephant in the room though. NBA Livehasnt made a game in two years and announced adding an additional league, the WNBA, into the game.NBA Live 18demo is out today for people to play.NBA 2K18media response today: we got stretch marks in the game now. Amazing. They are completely unbothered.

NBA 2K18launches for Nintendo Switch, PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on September 19, 2017.

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The Art Behind NBA 2K18 weirdly chooses to showcase, uh, stretch marks – App Trigger

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Provo business partners with London artist for mural of endangered species in Utah – Daily Herald08.10.17

Theres a little more color in downtown Provo now, thanks to a collaboration between Nu Skin and a London artist.

On the side of a wall near Nu Skins office on Center Street, Louis Masai painted a group of Gunnison sage grouse, as part of his efforts to highlight the situation the endangered species and the planet are in.

The piece, which incorporates a lot of bright and vivid colors, also operates as a call to action, Masai said.

We are inside the sixth extinction, which has been brought on by humans as opposed to a natural disaster, and I find that fascinating, Masai said. But I also recognize that we are in a position were we can rectify these problems but if people dont know about them how can we fix things and resolve things.

The mural, which was painted over the course of five days in mid-July depicts an adult male and female Gunnison sage grouse, an endangered bird native to southern parts of Utah and Colorado, as well as a baby bird.

The adult birds are painted in a colorful patchwork style, which Masai said denotes they are toys rather than the living bird.

The point being that the patchwork is a toy and for me that raises this issue there is nothing left, he said. Theres just this souvenir and Im posing a question to the audience: Is this really it? Is this really where you see things going? Does this not upset you, concern you? Do you not think we should do something about this?

However, the baby is painted as a it really would look and is meant to convey hope for the future.

Actually the baby is living for one reason: I wanted it to be a point of optimism and hope in that perhaps the species can continue because there is this one living baby, which means that if there is a baby of the other sex then the species can continue, he said.

Masai said his work often features endangered animals and he hopes that by bringing these animals to peoples attention things can change.

Other people have had different interpretations of it (the art), but thats whats good about art, Masai said. I can have the reason why Ive done it but that doesnt mean Im going to get that same reaction from all of the audience. People will have different ideas, and to me, they are all valuable.

I think what I have achieved is that people globally know if Im doing something theres a reason behind it, he added.

Leah Cadavona, vice president of global brand strategy for Nu Skin, said the mural brings some color and unique images to what was once a bare stretch of wall in the center of downtown Provo.

The mural came out of the companys push for innovation and a routine, informal meeting they have to discuss ideas. When someone pitched the idea for a mural in that space, Nu Skin started looking into it and interviewing artists.

Thats where they found out about Masai and the unique work he does.

He (Masai) does unique pieces; he never repeats anything, she said. His art will only be created one time and it will be unique for the area.

Cadavona said they also worked with Masai to make sure the mural was able to be something the international visitors could connect with. Among the patchwork, are different scraps of patterns like Pac Man, watermelons and anchors theres always something to look at and connect to.

So far, theyve already seen employees, community members and passers by stopping to look at the mural.

Part of the reason we wanted to beautify the space was to have something not only for employees to look at and enjoy but also for the community. We were born and bred in Provo and we are loud and proud about that. We have always wanted to play an active part of that community.

Shelby Slade covers community events, issues and stories for the Daily Herald.

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Provo business partners with London artist for mural of endangered species in Utah – Daily Herald

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Radiance Advanced Skin & Body Care combines science and art – Community Impact Newspaper08.10.17

After spending 28 years practicing family medicine, internal medicine and endocrinology, Lauren Olson decided to switch to a career path that would allow her to combine her passions for both science and art.

In 2005, Olson opened Radiance Advanced Skin & Body Care, a Woodlands-based full-service medical spa that also offers day spa services. The aesthetic facility offers a variety of services from CoolSculpting and facial plastic surgery to massages and laser hair removal.

I was very interested in combining the art and science of beauty and medicine, but I also felt like what we call health care is really more disease management, Olson said. I thought there needed to be more focus on helping people live a healthy life, andrather than putting bandages on symptomsgetting to the root of the problem.

Among its many services, Olson said the spa specializes in result-driven skin care and also has a full-service hair salon and nail salon specializing in natural nail care and products.

The spa is staffed by 20 technicians, aestheticians, massage therapists and hair stylists. It also boasts a facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon, a board-certified gynecologist and a licensed cosmetic nurse injector on staff.

With ongoing training and an emphasis on helping patients make educated decisions, Olson said one of the things that sets the spa apart from others in the area is the level of professionalism and knowledge her entire staff possesses.

We really want to focus on a treatment plan, spa Director Wendy Gentile said. Were going to take the time to sit down with you and talk to you about your aesthetic goals and see what we can do to reach those.

Most of the services at the spa can be enjoyed by both men and women, Olson said. Additionally, Radiance Advanced Skin & Body Care can also host private events and parties, and offers gift certificates.

Olson said that in addition to guests satisfaction, another one of her priorities is giving back to the community. Olson and her staff work with Memorial Hermann Health Systems In the Pink of Health campaign, the Montgomery County Womens Center and donates towels and robes to the Montgomery County Animal Shelter.

Olson said although the spa could use more space, she has no plans to open a second location in the future for fear of spreading herself too thin and not being able to give clients personalized treatment.

I think when people are having their face or body worked on, there is a huge trust factor there, she said. Weve had people come across the state and even the country just to see us. So its all about earning our guests trusts with our skills and our heart.

Radiance Advanced Skin & Body Care6777 Woodlands Parkway, The Woodlands281-367-4700www.woodlandsradiancespa.comHours: Mon, Wed. and Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Tue. and Thu. 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; closed Sundays

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Radiance Advanced Skin & Body Care combines science and art – Community Impact Newspaper

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