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Archive for the ‘Tattooing’

New Gig Harbor tattoo parlor offers decades of experience, custom work to clients – The News Tribune07.30.17

It is no surprise that Cory Cudney is an artist. In fact, it was decided before he was born.

Before I was even born, my dad decided I would be an artist, he said. I got such an unbelievable head start on it.

With an artist for a father, Cudney, 40, said he was drawing before he could write and sketching portraits since childhood.

These skills have served him well as he established and built his current career as a tattoo artist. Cudney has brought his 20 years of tattooing experience to Gig Harbor and opened Divine Machine Tattoo on July 15, his fourth shop and the only tattoo parlor in the Gig Harbor area.

Before I was even born, my dad decided I would be an artist. I got such an unbelievable head start on it.

Cory Cudney, Divine Machine Tattoo

I just wanted to have a place of my own because I believe in giving everyone their own space to work, he said. Im obsessed with a very minimalist environment.

Cudney previously owned shops in New York, where hes from. One shop, also called Divine Machine Tattoo, remains open in Buffalo, which he sold a few years ago.

Tattooing since 1997, Cudney is a self-taught tattooist who has made a name for himself by tattooing color portraits. In college at the time to study special effects makeup, Cudney was starting to have second thoughts about his career path when he spotted a magazine featuring portrait tattoos, something he hadnt known to be possible.

After seeing that magazine, he dropped out of school, moved from Pittsburgh to New York and got a regular job and his first tattooing equipment. The rest is history.

That is definitely not something I would recommend anyone else do, he said.

Cudney met his wife, Lindsey, in Gig Harbor while traveling to move to Los Angeles with a friend. Falling in love, both with Lindsey and the town, he decided not to move south. He is now teaching her how to tattoo.

After a year of tattooing in Tacoma, Cudney decided to open his own shop just outside of Gig Harbor city limits, bringing with him 30 to 40 established clients.

I specialize in realism and theres nobody else around here that even tries to do that, he said. I can duplicate absolutely anything you want on skin.

Being inspired by another persons tattoo is great, but you can get one thats entirely yours. I like doing realistic or abstract or replicating a specific piece of art … realism is my favorite thing to do.

Cudney

Joining him at the shop is Kristine Kris Aguilera, who Cudney said is a versatile and talented tattoo artist.

He noted that between the two of them, they can handle any customer request and prefer to work with clients on custom tattoo designs.

Being inspired by another persons tattoo is great, but you can get one thats entirely yours, he said. I like doing realistic or abstract or replicating a specific piece of art … realism is my favorite thing to do.

Divine Machine Tattoo is open Wednesday to Sunday from 12:30 to 8 p.m., Monday and Tuesday by appointment and is located at 5315 57th Street NW in Gig Harbor.

The shop can be reached at 253-324-1172 or at divinemachine tattoowa.com.

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PHOTOS: Bremerton men (and one woman) bare their tattoos – KUOW – KUOW News and Information07.12.17

Tattoo parlors tend to cluster near the Navy base in Bremerton. And indeed, a good chunk of the work done there is nautical in nature.

But its not all octopuses and anchors.

Tattoo artist Paul Weaver says he sees variety in his clients requests, as well as some patterns.

Women in the Navy tend to get larger pieces, he said. Women that arent in the Navy tend to get the more smaller, delicate pieces.

Guys, whether they are in the Navy, I think its a macho thing. They tend to go balls out. Which is a reference to running an engine at full speed, as in: more tattoos, faster, and even bigger.

But all that tattooing means hours under the needle and pain.

Weaver says it is NOT okay to wiggle and writhe. If theyre moving around like that, I say, ‘Dude, youre getting charged for this time. The more you move, the longer its going to take.'”

KUOW Photographer Megan Farmer found people in mid-tattoo who were obviously able to zone the pain out.

Carolyn Adolph can be reached atcadolph@kuow.org. Have a story idea?Use our story pitch form.

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How old do you have to be to get a tattoo in the UK and is it illegal to get inked when you’re drunk? – The Sun07.10.17


The Sun
How old do you have to be to get a tattoo in the UK and is it illegal to get inked when you're drunk?
The Sun
It is illegal for people under the age of 18 to get a tattoo, under the Tattooing Of Minors Act 1969. This is the case even if the minor is accompanied by their parents. However, teens can get inked in several European countries from the age of 16 – as

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Nose tattoos are the bold new ink trend that body art enthusiasts are loving but would YOU get one? – The Sun07.10.17


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Nose tattoos are the bold new ink trend that body art enthusiasts are loving but would YOU get one?
The Sun
To combat the pain, some social media users have opted for the 'hand poke' tattoo method over the use of a machine gun. The non-electric technique is done freestyle with a needle and ink. The look is more organic and is believed to hurt less as it isn

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Dana Point’s Josh Woods Chose a Career in Tattooing Over Toy Story – OC Weekly07.10.17

Monday, July 10, 2017 at 7:42 a.m.

Growing up in the far reaches of northern Michigan, Josh Woods knew he was a gifted artist from a pretty young age. By the time he graduated high school, Woods had already agreed to go to college in Detroit to study and work on computer graphic animation, but the teenager dropped out almost immediately after orientation. As it turned out, the Pixar path wasnt the one he was meant to follow.

It was right when Toy Story came out, so that was a huge thing at the time, Woods says. I just wasnt into computers back then, which is funny because I use them more than anything now. Anyway, I decided not to do that, so I moved to New York and got into a band.

For the next few years, Woods toured and recorded with his band. But once the group broke up, the artistically inclined musician realized there might be a spot for him in the visual arts world hed been introduced to through rocking out. After all, tattooing has been an integral part of rock n roll for decades even in a world dominated by Toy Story 2.

A lot of the bands that I knew were pretty heavily tattooed, so I was always asking them questions, Woods says. I felt like I could do better work than a lot of what I was seeing, and I started looking into it and checking it out. Then I ended up getting an apprenticeship when I was like 20 years old.

From that apprenticeship, Woods launched a tattooing career that ended up landing him on Ink Master and running one of the top shops in Nashville. Bust just a few months ago, the veteran artist gave up everything hed worked for to move out west, ending up in Dana Point to take advantage of the new private studio opened by his friend London Reese, the Black Lantern.

It was super scary, because I already owned one of the best shops in the country in Nashville, Tennessee and had owned it for nine years, Woods says. I was just becoming unhappy with the direction of where it was going and my business partner, and then one of my best friends passed away during all of the lawyers and fighting and stuff, so I decided it was time to move.

Of course, its taking some time for Woods to build up the same kind of clientele he had in Tennessee. Although hed undoubtedly stick out among other artists in most areas, working in OC means the top tier of Woods local competitors is the same as the best national and global artists he used to only see at conventions. But even with the tougher strain on the business side of things, it still feels like a dream for Woods to have his unique illustrative style considered a serious part of the scene.

Its kind of surreal to me to be included in the same industry as all of these guys, Woods says. I used to go to shows and see pretty much all of the legendary tattooers who are out here, and then I moved out here and its weird that all of those guys live and work down the street from me.

Aside from the tattooing community, Woods is also enjoying the rest of life in South County. Compared to his situation in Nashville, the tattooer is just glad to be working with his friends and embracing his days in the kind of beachside paradise he only couldve dreamed of growing up in the Michigan winters.

I went from being stressed out all the time to just being happy again, Woods says. I mean, the weather out here is phenomenal, and it really is the best thing I ever did. Just being out here in California, I still have to pinch myself every once in awhile.

The Black Lantern,24302 Del Prado Ave., Dana Point,949-429-7433, @joshwoods

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Miley Cyrus Got a New Tattoo With a Special Meaning – TeenVogue.com07.09.17

Miley Cyrus just showed off a new tattoo on Instagram, and its meaning is close to her heart (though its location is on her under-arm). It’s a sunflower with leaves forming the shape of a V, which symbolizes the vegan movement. “Vegan for life!” she captioned it.

Miley’s a long-time animal lover, with many dogs, cats, and even pigs of her own. She went vegan in 2014 and opened up about it to Paper the following year to set an example for others. Now, it looks like she’s made an even stronger commitment to the lifestyle by tattooing a symbol of it on her body.

Her fianc Liam Hemsworth told News.com.au in 2016 that he’d recently gone vegan, too. “Ethically, I didnt feel good about supporting those industries,” he said. “Its not good for the environment, its not good for people and certainly not for animals.”

Miley and Liam now share several dogs , one of whom is also on Miley’s arm . She’s got at least 36 tattoos total, also including a cat and a fish. We’re betting that even more animals will soon cover her skin, especially if she keeps finding creative locations like this one.

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Pulaski crackdown on unlicensed tattoo artists follows Hepatitis … – Roanoke Times07.08.17

PULASKI Town police have arrested four men for unlicensed tattooing, spurred by concerns that unsanitary conditions at their operations could cause hepatitis.

Bradley Allen Cook, Christopher Steven Alley, Timothy Andrew Hagee and Keith Alan Brogan all were charged in June with tattooing without a license, a misdemeanor offense that carries a maximum penalty of a year in jail and a fine of $2,500. The four men had Pulaski addresses; their ages were not available last week.

All were released on their own recognizance pending Aug. 1 hearings in Pulaski County General District Court.

Town police Chief Gary Roche and attorneys working on the cases said Thursday they could not recall similar charges in the regions courts. In an email, Roche wrote that the roundup of unlicensed tattoo-ers was driven by a rise in hepatitis C cases, and that there may be more arrests.

We are evaluating additional information that we received during the initial phases of these cases to determine if there are additional suspects, Roche wrote.

In May, Pulaski police issued a warning that hepatitis C had been spread by unclean and unlicensed tattooing.

If you have received a tattoo from an unlicensed tattoo artist, especially from someone in the Meadowview apartments area, you should contact the Virginia Department of Health or other medical facility and be tested for this disease, a police statement said in May.

According to search warrants filed in the cases, police tracked down the four suspects through their own advertising, with officers scanning Facebook for pictures of local tattoo artists at work. Cook had posted on Facebook the prices that he charged for various size tattoos, according to a search warrant.

On another Facebook page, a post indicated Brogan was inking people at his residence, a claim backed up by witnesses, an investigator wrote in a search warrant.

Virginia law makes it illegal to charge money for tattoos without a license. The health department is to inspect tattoo businesses to see that they follow regulations regarding cleanliness and safety.

Hepatitis is a viral infection that can damage peoples livers, sometimes fatally. There are three common strains of the virus, designated as hepatitis A, B and C, with different characteristics. People who clear a hepatitis infection within six months are said to have had an acute case, while those who the virus continues to infect have chronic conditions. There are vaccines for hepatitis A and B, but not C.

The health department in May declined to say how many people were thought to have contracted hepatitis from unlicensed tattooing in Pulaski.

On Thursday, health department spokesman Robert Parker pointed to preliminary figures that indicated that the New River Health District, which includes Pulaski, Montgomery, Floyd and Giles counties and Radford, had zero acute cases of hepatitis C this year from January through May. The New River Health District reported 69 cases of chronic hepatitis C during this time period.

Health department figures for all of Virginia showed 26 acute cases of hepatitis C and 3,392 cases of chronic hepatitis C from January through May, compared to 24 acute cases and 3,695 chronic cases during the same time period in 2016.

January to May totals from 2012 to 2015 varied from 12 to 24 acute hepatitis C cases across Virginia, while chronic cases for the five-month period increased each year from 1,175 in 2012 to 1,861 in 2015.

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Believe it or not, tattooing in Indiana has only been legal for 20 years … – WANE07.08.17

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) Odds are you know at least one person with a tattoo. In Allen County alone there are 29 tattoo shops. Up until 20 years ago on July 1 the only legal place to get a tattoo in Indiana was a physicians office.

Since it became legal, the tattooing world has come up from the underground. In Fort Wayne, tattooing has quickly been adopted.

We became the 47th state, not the last state, to legalize tattooing, Fort Wayne tattoo artist Donny Manco said.

When you drive down the street you see tattoo shops. When you turn on the TV you see tattoo shows. When you pass by people a lot of times you see tattoos. Its hard to remember a time when we didnt see them, but Manco remembers.

When I first started tattooing there were like knocks you had to do on doors, Manco said. It was very speak easy.

In the mid 1990s the Fort Wayne native and now owner of New Republic Tattoo knew he wanted to start tattooing. Since it was illegal his apprenticeship started in an artists basement.

Soon after state health officials got on board, and the 1997 General Assembly passed legislation to legalize tattooing. A lot of it was spearheaded State Senator Richard Worman of Leo. Like laws still today, that law went into effect on July 1, 1997.

It was more about how do we make them safe, how do we look at them from a safety aspect to say things may need to be cleaned in a certain way, Allen County Health Department Administrator Mindy Waldron said. How do we prevent the spread of disease?

Since, Fort Wayne hasnt looked back. Manco called the city a hub of talent. Hunter Strong traveled from out of state to get his first tattoo done by Manco.

Im getting an American flag with an eagle in the middle of it, Strong said. Fourth of July weekend is the best time to ever get it.

Twenty years, 29 shops and even a yearly convention later Fort Wayne has adopted tattooing as part of the culture.

Fort Wayne we are a hub of talent, Manco said. Im proud of that. I think that Fort Wayne adopted tattooing early. Which is a credit to Fort Wayne.

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3D nipples and scar and burn camouflage tattooing coming to Devon salon – Devon Live07.08.17

3D nipples and scar and burn camouflage colouration are just some of the treatments soon to be on offer in a North Devon salon.

Charley Klein Permanent Make Up and Cosmetic Treatments on Paiges Lane in Barnstaple will be offering a new treatment called medical tattooing.

The owner, Charley Klein, is due to complete her final assessment in London for the procedure this month.

Medical tattooing is performed to areas of the body where trauma, past surgery and scarring has occurred.

She already has a waiting list of clients in North Devon who wish to have a medical tattoo.

Charley, who also owns Charley’s Angels Hair, Nails and Beauty, said medical tattooing can help clients regain confidence and self esteem.

She said: “Medical tattooing can help provide a solution to clients that have experienced a difference to their appearance due to alopecia, chemotherapy or other conditions.

“I feel it is incredibly important to be able to offer these types of treatments in my clinics. The way we feel about our appearance can mentally affect us.

“When a lady has experienced breast cancer and looks in the mirror every morning at her reconstructed breast without a nipple, its a constant reminder of the traumatic experience she has endured.”

Charley also said people can feel “delicate about their appearance” after surgery. She hopes that the medical tattooing treatments can help “rebuild their confidence and bring a sense of normality back to their life”.

She said: “I am passionate about helping people overcome the trauma they have experienced after surgery.”

Charley set up her first business in 2010. Prior to that she worked in a bank.

She started as a mobile beautician alongside her part-time job at the bank.

She said: “I was getting busier as a mobile therapist, offering a range of beauty treatments.

“I was the first person to offer HD Brows in North Devon and am now an HD Brows master stylist.

“I decided to leave my job at the bank and in October 2013, I opened my first salon, offering all things beauty and nails.

“Due to the salons success, we expanded in 2015 by moving to a larger premises, which included a hair studio.”

Charley’s passion for cosmetics came when she had her first HD Brow experience in Exeter nine years ago.

She said: “Having this done made a huge impact of having thicker fuller eyebrows.

“I wanted to see the same smile on more people’s faces when having it done.

“I was getting clients coming in with very little hair which made me think what more can we do?

“What can I do for the clients that suffer with alopecia? What can I do for clients that have been through chemotherapy? Permanent makeup was the answer.”

Charley, who also offers a range of permanent makeup treatments including tattooed eyebrows, said: “As soon as I entered into the world of permanent makeup I wanted to do more.

“This resulted in medical tattooing. I have had family and friends who have fought cancer. To be able to give something back and help the confidence of others in a similar situation is very close to my heart.”

Permanent Makeup and medical tattooing is a cosmetic technique that employs pigmentation into the dermis skin with a very small needle or a cluster of needles.

Charley intends to offer 3D areola and nipple pigmentation, skin graft and vitiligo pigmentation, scar and burns camouflage colouration as well as scar and burns relaxation and improvement.

She said 3D nipple and areola pigmentation is for clients who have experienced breast cancer and mastectomy. Other treatments include skin grafts vitiligo pigmentation.

She said: “We will recreate the illusion of 3D nipple and areola.We can also help with treatments following breast reduction or uplift surgery, pre and post gender reassignment surgery, or gynecomastia surgery.

“Skin graft and vitiligo pigmentation helps restore your natural colour by carefully infusing custom blended, skin tone pigments into the de-pigmented areas of your skin.

“Burns survivors all experience different levels of body image distress which may involve grief, sadness, anxiety and worry. I will conduct a thorough consultation to determine the needs and outcome offering various skin test’s of colours before initial procedure.”

Charley said she had received positive feedback regarding the new treatments.

She said: “It’s astonishing how many people are in interested or client refers a friend.

“Most people have been touched in one way or another by these less socially talked about traumas.

“All case studies I have done already are real people, who have experienced real medical conditions.

“The reaction of having these procedures are undescribable. Tears of joy, hugs and smiles.”

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Tattoos: how the art gets under our skin – New Scientist07.03.17

Captured in a silicone cast: art by tattooist Matt Houston

Paul Abbitt

By Simon Ings

Tattoo: British Tattoo Art Revealed, National Maritime Museum, Falmouth, UK, to 7 January 2018

TURN left as you enter Tattoo: British Tattoo Art Revealed, and you will be led through the history of a venerable and flourishing folk art. Turn right and you will confront a wall of 100 disembodied forearms. They arent real, which is a nuisance for the artists who tattooed them since silicone is nothing like as easy to work with as human skin but a comfort for the rest of us.

Alice Snape, editor of Things & Ink magazine, curated this wall to showcase the range of work by todays tattoo artists in the UK. But you really need to see the rest of the exhibition first. You need time to contemplate the problem Snapes 100 Hands is there to solve, that this is an exhibition whose subject is entitled to wander off, and cover up.

Theres something frustratingly arch about tattooing. Tattooists jealously guard their stencilled designs (called flashes) even as they create pieces that, by their very nature, come with their own sales reps. Clients (perhaps influenced by 2005s reality show Miami Ink) wax lyrical on the deeply personal stories behind their tats, then plaster photos of them all over Instagram.

Practitioners exploit their liminal status even while they bemoan their lack of recognition. In a show full of repeating figures and useful (though never intrusive) signposting, my favourites were the boards that tell you what the papers said at different times in history. Every generation, it seems, has come to the same startling realisation that tattoos arent just for sailors, yet the information never seems to stick. Tattooing is an art that does not want to be fully known.

The problem facing the shows curators is: how do you define the limits of your enquiry? If the art has to be invited in, cajoled, reassured, even flattered into taking part, how do you stop shaky inclusion criteria from compromising objectivity?

Natural history solved the problem long ago. The rule used to be that if you wanted to study something you went out and shot it: the rifle was as much part of your kit as your magnifying glass. The Maoris of Polynesia, aware of the value Western visitors put on souvenirs, used to catch people, tattoo their faces, decapitate them and sell their heads to collectors. The draughtsman aboard Charles Darwins ship the Beagle had a travel box lined with the tattooed skin of dead Maori warriors.

People make tattoo guns out of anything that vibrates. The first were Victorian doorbells

These days the tattooed collect themselves. Geoff Ostling, for one, has arranged for his heavily (and beautifully) tattooed skin to go to the National Gallery of Australia after he dies. Gemma Angel, an adviser to this exhibition, spent her doctoral study among the 300 or so items in the Wellcome Collections archive of human skin, and she reckons theres a growing interest in post-mortem tattoo preservation.

It is to this exhibitions great credit that it takes no time at all to find a voice pinpointing exactly what is so discomforting about this idea. In a cabinet of personal testimonies I find this remark by a Catherine Marston: Tattoo is an art form but I dont think they should be collected because when a person dies they die too. You hear of some really weird designers that use skin thats cut afterwards, once they die then that goes on display. I think that diminishes the whole idea of a tattoo. Its art with a time zone rather than timeless.

Such voices are valuable here because even this democratic, eclectic exhibition cant quite capture the shuddering intimacy of the form it celebrates. Tattoos are not just artworks, they are also performances. Getting a tattoo hurts just enough to make you dizzy, and lodges that intimate moment in your memory.

Though the art is the point of the show, it would not work nearly so well without the artefacts it has borrowed from working tattooists and from the Science Museum in London. People make tattoo guns out of virtually anything that vibrates. The first machines were made out of Victorian doorbells. You can salivate at images all you like, but nothing gets under the skin like a doorbell-based tattoo gun once wielded by Johnny Two-Thumbs of Hong Kong.

This article appeared in print under the headline Skin-shuddering intimacy

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