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Archive for the ‘Tattooing’

Charlotte Crosby FINALLY reveals the tattoo boyfriend Bear gave … – Mirror.co.uk04.07.17

Charlotte Crosby and Stephen Bear have already talked about babies, rings and weddings but they’ve already given each other something that proves some serious commitment.

That’s right: permanent tattoos.

The reality twosome who are currently co-hosting MTV’s new show Just Tattoo Of Us have inked each other’s body in a bid to prove their long-lasting love, and Charlotte has unveiled her art for the first time.

Posting a picture of her hand on Twitter, she captioned the image with a fish emoji to match the shaky outline of a fish tattooed onto her wrist.

The simple design looks like a skew-wiff infinity symbol, with bleeding edges and a bit where the line doesn’t quite join up smoothly and Charlotte’s fans were quick to notice.

“Was he sitting on a washing machine when he done it?” asked one.

“Never get tattooed when jetlagged, think you’re gonna regret that one,” wrote another.

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A third groaned: “Oh Charlotte, what have u done? That’s a pretty s**t tattoo to be stuck with for life. It’s not easily hidden either. Where’s ur head at????”

But the 26-year-old dismissed their cries of dismay, telling them: “Nooooo noooo the whole point was it being bad we did them DUR.”

She also shared the video of herself tattooing Bear on his finger.

“When you tattoo your boyfriend,” she captioned the footage, which showed her very calmly pressing ink into his hand while a bearded tattoo artist supervised.

The couple have only been dating for a few weeks, but already they’ve become serious enough to talk about their future.

Speaking to OK! magazine last month, the pair confessed they’re looking to move in together this summer, and Bear announced that this relationship is for keeps.

“Next December I want to impregnate her,” he confessed.

“They’re going to be called Teddy whether it’s a boy or a girl. I’ll be 29 when the baby’s born that’s a good age.”

The pair were recently spotted looking at rings, and Bear’s already got his eye on the perfect dazzler for his girlfriend bear-shaped, of course.

“[I’ll spend] a f*****g lot. More than 20,000,” he said.

“But if we break up then I’m taking it back. I don’t give a f**k. Sorry, babe, but that’s 20 gees there, see you later!”

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Spanish hospital offers nipple tattoos to breast cancer survivors – AOL04.05.17

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Tattoo artist gives new nipples to breast cancer survivors

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Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, takes a picture of the nipple he has tattooed on the reconstructed breast of cancer survivor Mamen Malagon at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera TEMPLATE OUT

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, reacts upon inspecting the breasts of cancer survivor Mamen Malagon at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera

Inks are seen on a table as tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada tattoos breast cancer survivor Mamen Malagon at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, inspects the breasts of cancer survivor Mamen Malagon at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana VeraTEMPLATE OUT

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, drives to the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, inspects the breasts of cancer survivor Mamen Malagon at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, gets a hug from cancer survivor Mamen Malagon after tattooing a nipple on her reconstructed breast at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, tattoos a nipple on the reconstructed breast of cancer survivor Mamen Malagon at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera TEMPLATE OUT

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada works on a tattoo at his tattoo parlour in Madrid, Spain, March 24, 2017. Picture taken March 24, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, finishes tattooing a nipple on the reconstructed breast of cancer survivor Mamen Malagon at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera TEMPLATE OUT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada works on a tattoo at his tattoo parlour in Madrid, Spain, March 24, 2017. Picture taken March 24, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera

Cancer survivor Mamen Malagon reacts as tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind from an eye due to a tumour, tattoos a nipple on her reconstructed breast at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017.REUTERS/Susana Vera TEMPLATE OUT

Tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada, who is blind in one eye due to a tumour, jokes with breast cancer survivor Mamen Malagon at the Hospital Universitario de Torrejon, in Torrejon de Ardoz, outside Madrid, Spain, March 23, 2017. Picture taken March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera TEMPLATE OUT

A painting of tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada hangs from the wall next to his bag at his tattoo parlour in Madrid, Spain, March 24, 2017. Picture taken March 24, 2017. REUTERS/Susana Vera

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MADRID, April 5 (Reuters) – Arms covered in red and green ink, tattoo artist Alvaro Quesada is hardly what cancer survivors expect at a Madrid infirmary, the first public hospital in Spain to offer nipple and areola tattooing.

Yet his service of tattooing realistic-looking nipples onto women who have had their breasts reconstructed after mastectomies signals the final step of recovery from cancer, and women react with emotion to the process.

SEE ALSO: School accused of ‘tattooing’ students who have no lunch money

“They leave crying and hugging me. This is therapy,” says 32-year-old Quesada, who takes time out from his tattoo parlor to attend patients at the hospital.

Reconstruction can occur months, or even years, after breast cancer surgery with tissue expanders typically installed to stretch the skin and make room for a future implant. Creating the nipple comes later and involves one more operation.

“At this point most patients are exhausted,” said Lorenzo Rabadan, the doctor who first approached Quesada about providing women with an alternative to surgery. He invited the tattoo artist to train staff on the technique.

Clutching a pale pink tattoo gun, Quesada creates the three-dimensional illusion of a nipple on a patient’s reconstructed breast, mixing colors with names like ‘rose pink’, ‘brown sugar’ and ‘tribal black’ to mimic the natural shade of an areola.

Half-blind, Quesada offers his service free of charge. The national health service did not cover the cost of his false eye after he lost his left eye to a benign tumor.

For many, a quick and relatively painless session marks the end of a chapter.

“This means it’s over and I can pick up my life again,” said Mamen Malagon, 43. She was diagnosed with the disease in 2011 resulting in the mastectomy or removal of her left breast.

“All done,” she sighed as she got dressed. “Do you know what it means to say that it’s over?”

Meet another tattoo artist helping cancer survivors:

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School accused of ‘tattooing’ students who have no lunch money – AOL04.05.17

A second-grade student in Phoenix, Arizona was given a stamp on his wrist because he couldn’t pay for his lunch.

A photo was shared with a friend of the student’s mother, who shared it on Twitter:

“My friend’s son came home from school Thursday with a stamp on his arm that said ‘LUNCH MONEY’ because his account was low,” said the Twitter user, whom BuzzFeed News identified as Juan Fortenberry. “And this is apparently the way at least one school in Arizona is notifying parents of dwindling lunch funds.”

Fortenberry expressed his distaste over the stamp: “Looks like shaming to me. Like, y’all couldn’t send a note? Y’all couldn’t think for two seconds about the numerous references of branding someone as a stigma?”

The photo of the child’s wrist went viral on the site, receiving hundreds of likes and retweets.

Check out social reactions

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Social reactions to ‘lunch money’ stamp

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@juanyfbaby They did this to me growing up in Colorado, too, so it’s been around for at least 20 years

@juanyfbaby We got stamps on our hands ten years ago at my elementary school. They once took my lunch away in front of my friends too

@juanyfbaby @shala1009 My high school used to do this just this year. I got my lunch taken away at least twice.

@tesscatherine @juanyfbaby We got hand stamps in elementary, but they were small and a fun shape. Lunch staff didn’ https://t.co/hknBmmEh2D

@obrient911 @juanyfbaby I owed under a dollar in middle school and they didn’t let me take the tray off the line

@juanyfbaby That’s not remotely OK

@juanyfbaby @_b_e_n_c_ HOW MUCH DOES A CUSTOM STAMP COST buy some lunches fucc this got me heated

@juanyfbaby SHAME on the school. Who does this to kids?

@juanyfbaby This is abuse. What the hell?! Branding a child – doesn’t matter if it’s ink – for money is unacceptable.

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The student’s mother, Tara Chavez, told BuzzFeed News that her child was humiliated by the stamp. Apparently, the lunch lady at Desert Cove Elementary School did not give him a choice over whether to be stamped.

“Normally, I get a slip in his folder when he needs more money,” she said. “He was humiliated, didn’t even want me to take a picture of it.” When Chavez checked the lunch money balance online, it had 75 cents on it.

She emailed the school’s principal, who said that the aim is not to humiliate — and students are supposed to be given a choice of the stamp or a reminder slip.

The incident has caused concern over whether the stamp policy should remain. On Monday, an editorial called “Why Are Paradise Valley Schools Publicly Shaming Students Who Run Out Of Lunch Money?” was published in the Phoenix New Times.

In an update, the New Times reported that Desert Cove Elementary will no longer use stamps to notify parents of a low balance. Paradise Valley Unified School District spokesperson Becky Kelbaugh told the New Times: “It was never the intention of Desert Cove Elementary School administration and staff to embarrass any student by using the stamp. Students were given the choice between a letter or reminder stamp. Going forward, Desert Cove Elementary School will send a letter home notifying parents of low lunch balances.”

More from AOL.com: High school won’t let teen bring his grandma to prom Teacher’s viral Facebook post shines light on child hunger The most competitive university in America isn’t in the Ivy League

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The Human Artist – Rocky Mountain Collegian04.05.17

An avid culture that has immersed itself amidst the 21st century is that of tattoos. From tribal pieces and memorial portraits to tramp stamps, tattoos are becoming more and more a staple in the minds of the youth. However, the youth are so caught up in the style choices of tattooing, many are unaware of the origin of these pieces of art.

Brockton Fowler, co-owner and artist at Parabrahma Tattoos, had a lot to say about where tattoos come from. Tattooing itself has all its ties back to shamanism they were always done by a holy person, because they looked at it as a power thing, sigilism. Tattoos derive from a very ancient time that even predates language as a whole.

Fowler continued saying that these tattoos were used for things on a much more widespread level. Spells that connected people, provided power, and even were believed to heal people. These [tattoos] were given to you, you didnt design one or create one, the tattooer gave you one.

As a population, custom tattoos are a much more common practice now. Entering the studio, presenting your ideas, and then receiving a tattoo that you and the artist put together is the staple for getting a tattoo in todays world.

However there is something special about the tattoo industry and the culture that surrounds it. The connection that develops between an artist and the recipient is something that is unique to its own.

Fowler; said, even when people get those basic tattoos. There is something about the exposure. It is a gateway to something much bigger and they dont even know it yet.

Continuing, the shop and its name, Parabrahma, is the ultimate enlightenment or ultimate goal. The source of ultimate potential, and thats how a tattoo should be. We should generate an ultimate mark of creative potential and attain that goal. The artists and the recipient have to let go of all this emotion and just create.

Spirituality, human connection and mutual respect are all aspects that Fowler says contribute to the tattoo culture even in the days before language. The idea of having something so permanent and everlasting, you have to have something behind it, and maybe you dont know what that is at that exact moment; but at some point you will.

As for the physical side of tattoos, Fowler stated, people get tattoos in hopes to get to the person they want to be. Have their spiritual self match their physical appearance. Deep down they believe that this addition to their body is what was meant to be and it shows in people.

Body modification as a spiritual practice is what people do in hopes to reach the self that is on the inside. People want to be able to express their mentality through physical means and tattoos have always been a outlet to do that.

Tattoo artists, as Fowler says, are people who live in a state of half in reality and half out. I see people come in every day and ask me to put these pieces on them and create these works of art, but I as a person have tattoos on my neck, my face and that is something that people dont quite understand. Even in the old days, the shamans were scary dudes with tattoos everywhere and its not that much different now.

Once you peel back that outer layer of the eerie taboo, you get to the person that feels they are where they need to be. Doing the things they need to do. Thats what it means to be involved in the multifaceted world of tattoo culture.

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Got you under my skin – Inquirer.net04.04.17

FROM subculture to pop culture. It used to be a thing only for sailors and jailbirds. Now look around and youll see not only celebrities and rock stars getting inked but your friends and neighbors, too.

Many indigenous peoples around the world mark their bodies with tattoos. The word tattoo comes from the Samoan word tatau, which means to mark. Tattooing continues to be practiced among native people from the Pacific, through Asia, the Middle East, parts of Africa, the Americas and Europe.

Since olden times, as part of Filipino culture, tattooing was a show of rank and accomplishments and some believed that tattoos also conferred magical qualities. The more famous tattooed peoples are among the Bontoc, Igorot, Kalinga, and Ifugao tribes.

Whang-od Oggay is a Filipina tattoo artist from Buscalan, Tinglayan, Kalinga, Philippines. She is considered as the last mambabatok from the Butbut people in Buscalan Kalinga and the oldest tattoo artist in the Philippines.

Filipino tattooing was first documented by the European Spanish explorers when they landed in the Islands in the 16th century.

Today, in the 21st century, tattoos are in and popular with the cool kids (not just in Hollywood)! This last decade has seen the rise of tattoo culture.

Getting inked has become a trend and a growing number of people have the desire to permanently mark themselves with symbols, words, phrases, pictures, etc. So what if they look bad 50 years from now?

Tattoos symbolize a memory or a person or a certain phase in life that they want to remember.

Some tattoos make the wearer unique and special. Others mark their affiliation to a group, gang or religion.

There are some people, feeling strongly about family, get a tattoo honoring mom or the names of their children.

However, tattooing your girlfriends or boyfriends name often leads to regret when love has faded months or years later and, sadly, the tattoo name has not.

In fact, 1 in 5 people with tattoos in the U.K. report having regrets, saying they were too young at the time.

The same applies to cosmetic tattoos like eyebrows. Previously, eyebrow tattoos were permanent, often looked harsh, and over time tended to gain a blue or greenish tinge because of oxidizing metallic pigments. Fortunately, these days, better pigments and methods are available.

Unwanted eyebrow tattoos can be fixed or removed.

Tattoo removal has been performed with various tools since the history of tattooing. While tattoos were once considered permanent, it is now possible to remove them with treatments, fully or partially. Common techniques included dermabrasion, TCA (Trichloroacetic acid, anacid that removes the top layers of skin, reaching as deep as the layer in which the tattoo ink resides), salabrasion (scrubbing the skin with salt), cryosurgery and excision which is sometimes still used along with skin grafts for larger tattoos.

Today, laser tattoo removal usually refers to the non-invasive removal of tattoo pigments using Q-switched lasers. Typically, black and other darker-colored inks can be removed completely. A laser uses intense light, which penetrates the skin to break up the ink particles and leads to tattoo fading.

The bodys immune system will thenremove these pigments over time. The laser energy is harmless, and only targets the pigmented skin, leaving the un-inked surrounding skin unharmed.

This type of laser requires only topical anesthesia and may need two to three sessions in intervals of about two to four weeks.

If you would like information, advice and help with tattoo removal you can text Margie at 0908 895 2935.

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Local tattoo artist talks inspiration and ink culture – ECU The East Carolinian04.04.17

When most people think of art, they think of paintings, sculptures and maybe even music. However, not many people think of the human body as being a canvas for an artist. Jay Edmondson is an artist, and tattooing beautiful images for people to call their own is what he does.

Edmondson is a tattoo artist at Cape Fear Tattoo and Body Piercing who truly appreciates the craft and creates works of art that will last a lifetime. However, tattooing was not Edmondsons first passion.

I have always really been into music and art, said Edmondson. I went to East Carolina for music and was actually going to teach.

Although Edmondson loved music, he lost his passion and was interested in taking his creative talents elsewhere. Edmonson loved drawing and had always been interested in tattoo culture.

I always loved tattoos and thought heavily tattooed people looked really cool, said Edmondson. The artist who was doing my tattoos at the time offered me an apprenticeship and really taught me values, shading and really helped with my growth.

Today, Edmonson tattoos for people of all walks of life and his goal is to make something the person will cherish. Edmonson can tattoo in different styles but monochromic tattooing, or black and grey, is what he flourishes at.

I just have more fun doing black and grey, said Edmondson. There is a lot of detail and depth that goes into faces and I just love doing it.

Edmonson said the most challenging tattoo he has ever done was a portrait.

Its not the most challenging, but more like stressful. Doing portraits of loved ones are the most stressful to me because youve never seen this person before and you want to make it right for the client, said Edmondson. It is not like a portrait of a famous person who you know what they are supposed to look like. So I would definitely say portraits of loved ones are the most challenging.

To keep motivated and inspired, Edmondson said he looks to other artists and sees what they are doing to create their works.

The eyes are the best tool you have in this field and I always look at what other artists are doing and ask myself, what is it they that they are doing to make that happen and it kind of goes from there, said Edmondson. I think that everyone great looks to others for inspiration in any field and artists are constantly borrowing from each other to make themselves better artists.

Edmonsons passion for tattooing is not just with the craft itself; he wants to change the stigma and educate the public on tattoos through his work.

Being in the Bible-Belt area, tattoos are seen as different and what we do here (at Cape Fear Tattoo) is to hopefully educate the public and break that negative stigma through our art, said Edmondson. Tattooing is an artform and I want people to know that it can truly be something custom and something you make all your own.

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‘There’s so much healing going on’: Inuit tattoo revival reaches Ulukhaktok – CBC.ca04.04.17

After eight months of planning, Hovak Johnston has been able to bring the Inuit Tattoo Revitalization Project to Ulukhaktok, N.W.T.

“The oldest woman that I tattooed, she was 73 years old, and it’s so powerful,” she said. “I’ve had so many tears already.”

Johnston arrived Friday and will be in the hamlet of just over 400 people for more than a week, one year after she brought the Inuit Tattoo Revitalization Project to Kugluktuk.

The goal is to bring back a tradition that had nearly become “extinct” in the Inuit culture.

“It hadn’t been practiced in three generations,” said Johnston.

Johnston spent about nine years learning the art of traditional tattooing. She arrived in the community with another tattoo artist from Yellowknife as well as a videographer andphotographer.The goal is to do as many tattoos as possible, for anyone who wants them.

Hovak Johnston, Mary Kudlik and Julia Ogina show off their traditional Inuit tattoos. (Submitted by Hovak Johnston)

In all, the trip cost around $70,000. Money was raised from sponsors like Tides Canada and the hamlet, as well as individual community members.

“There was so much interest and people willing to help,” she said.

So far, Johnston has tattooed 17 women five of them with facial tattoos.

“It’s getting the young and the old talking about a tradition that was not talked about for a very long time and with these young people, getting a chance to learn about markings they never had a chance to ask about before,” said Johnston.

“It’s not just tattooing them, not just putting ink in them. There’s so much healing going on.”

Some of the women being tattooed are repeat customers. Julia Ogina was one of the women that Johnstonfirst tattooed last year.

“My dad encouraged me over the years to get my great grandmother’s tattoos. It was something that very few people or nobody did,” Ogina said.

The 54-year-old has now been able to get tattoos on her chin,cheeks and wrists.

She’s also helping Johnston interpret thetattoos other women are getting, which vary from region to region. Oginadescribes it as helping the women “finding their stories and finding their symbols.”

“We’ve had a mother and daughtercoming, mother and grandmother coming in. It’s very enriching even for the elders to remember. It allows them to remember their own childhood and memories they thought they’d forgotten.”

Hovak Johnston poses with a satisfied client on day one in Ulukhaktok. (Inuit Tattoo Revitalization Project/Facebook)

While in the community, Johnston is on the lookout for anyone who wants to learn and pass on the tradition. She’s giving presentations at the school as well as documenting her trip.

She plans to return in May for touch-ups, and to present a series of outdoor billboards with photos of the tattoos taken on this trip.

“I’d like to have outdoor billboards to go around the community so that the women will remember this day and the community will have something to talk about when they see the billboards.”

Johnston leaves April 11. A feast and celebration is planned for April 10.

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Column: Jen Shakti, the Modern Tattoo Shaman – The Wild Hunt04.02.17

The tattoo has been an important sacred trial for individuals across multiple cultures for generations. The path of pain, identified in Western Witchcraft by Gerald Gardner and other early 20th-century esotericists, has a long history of altering consciousness and manifesting changes in peoples lives. Native cultures around the world have been utilizing the tattoo to mark sacred life passages for centuries, and those of Western heritage have been doing so for almost as long as they have had contact with outside cultures. Whether it is a sacred mark of a warrior initiation, or a mark of military service, sacred ink that tells a tribal persons life story or a mark of ones alma mater, tattoos have long represented what is important in the narrative of peoples lives.

[Photo credit: Jen Shakti.]

Jen Shakti, proprietor of the Mermaids Tale, is one of those artists. Shakti describes herself as a modern tattoo shaman who uses her artistic ability to provide a medicine gift to her clients. For her, tattooing is more than a business. It is an initiatory ritual where the magical intention is permanently inscribed into the client. I use my visionary talent and mythic symbolism with ceremony to create a powerful beneficial shift for my client through the initiation, she explains. She knows that tattooing is her lifes work.

Jen Shakti [courtesy photo].

The perfect clients would come in with projects and experiences that taught me what to do, she remembers. Talk about synchronicity! Through this work, Shakti developed a unique, ceremonial tattoo experience.

Getting a sacred tattoo is a unique and personalized experience, says Shakti. First, there is a consultation where she and the client work together to develop both the art and the intention of the ritual. She asks the client what they wish for this tattoo to bring into their lives, and clients sometimes choose to participate in a shamanic healing before they continue with the ceremony. I listen for clues and details on both the art and the ceremony, says Shakti, I ask questions to envision the design and feel what the energetic technique is going to be and the best strategy for working together.

[Photo credit: Jen Shakti.]

Sacred space is ceremonially closed after the work of the tattoo is complete. With clear energy, the intention has been implanted, and the sacredness is again acknowledged at the end of the working. It is really sweet and beautiful, she says.

[Photo credit: Jen Shakti.]

[Photo credit: Jen Shakti.]

Balance, she thinks, can be restored through initiations and rites of passage. Shakti believes that all initiations are an innovation in spirit to engage life at a higher level. I feel that this is what most people are seeking in spiritual practice, and tattoos are a beautiful compliment to that.

To further that quest for balance, Shakti has begun to offer one- to two day tattoo retreats. They are all-inclusive events. The retreat is a customized experience to inspire the best version of you. It includes private accommodations as well as visits to local sacred sites and a full length healing session. The tattoo is the main event. Shakti says that there is also time for integration, and she offers shamanic techniques to keep the magic flowing. Beyond these retreats, Shakti is also willing to train other spiritually-oriented tattoo artists to join in with the sacred tattoo philosophy.

My vision, she concludes, is that as more people get empowered through tattoos consciousness will shift to bring even greater light to the world. I believe that is what Im here to do at this time. It is a lofty goal, but Shakti is working toward it session by session, needle by needle, one ceremony at a time.

* * *

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Plattsburgh charged with tattooing teen | Local News … – Plattsburgh Press Republican03.31.17

PLATTSBURGH A Plattsburgh man is accused of illegally tattooing a 15-year-old boy.

Last Friday, Clinton County sheriff’s deputies charged Raymond M. Phillips, 48, with four counts of second-degree unlawfully dealing with a child, a misdemeanor, according to a Sheriff’s Office press release.

The four charges relate to the number of times Phillips is accused of tattooing the teen, Chief Deputy Maj. Michael Reid explained.

According to the State Department of Health, it is illegal to tattoo minors in New York state, regardless of whether or not parental consent is given.

DEPUTY SAW TATTOO

Investigation into the matter began when a deputy assigned as a school resource officer to Beekmantown Central School noticed a student had a tattoo, Reid said.

He then asked a staff member how old the boy was, reportedly identifying Phillips as the probe continued.

Phillips allegedly did the tattoo work out of his residence, and he and the teen met up through word of mouth, Reid said.

It is believed the four separate occasions when he tattooed the boy occurred between March 2015 and the present.

Phillips did not force the teen to get the tattoos, Reid added.

NO MORE CHARGES

Reid did not know how many tattoos Phillips gave the minor andcould not describe what the designs were as that could compromise the student’s identity.

“No more charges are pending, unless obviously something more comes to light,” the major said.

Phillips was issued an appearance ticket for Plattsburgh City Court.

The State Penal Code states that a second-degree unlawfully dealing with a child conviction carries a possible sentence of up to three months in jail.

Email Cara Chapman:

cchapman@pressrepublican.com

Twitter: @PPR_carachapman

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From prison tats to permanent masterpiece: Edmonton tattoo artist buzzing about ink evolution – CBC.ca03.31.17

When Stephanie Corvus laid down her first line of ink, tattoos were still for outcasts.

She was 15 when her uncle,just out of prison,offered to share one of the skills he’d picked up behind bars.

“He taught me to build rotary machines, it’s the same style of machine that they build in jail, and I started tattooing all my high school friends out of my basement,” said Corvus, a custom tattoo artist who will be showcasing her work at the Edmonton Tattoo and Arts Festivalthis weekend.

Stephanie Corvus is a custom tattoo artist in Edmonton. (Stephanie Corvus/Facebook)

“Not really the way that you you want to start, but that was at the tail end of a different era.”

Tattoo cultureand Corvus’s careerhave both come a long way since then.

When she first started working in the industry, the stigma around tattoos was immense, Corvus said. Even her “biker”mother was horrified to learn of her career aspirations.

“When my mom found out I was a tattoo artist, she literally said to me, ‘But only hookers and sailors get tattoos,’ and this is my mom who rides a Harley,” said Corvus, a resident artist at Red Loon Tattoo and Piercing in Edmonton.

“Even among that group there was still a strong stigma, especially against women having and doing tattoos.”

The industry has experienced a paradigm shift. The proliferation of reality television series such as LA Ink, which profiled celebritytattoo artists like Kat Von D, brought the industry out of the underground, said Corvus.

“It was kind of the end of the outlaw era of tattooing where you couldn’t go into a tattoo shop and ask a ton of questions because they would kick you out, whereas now, we’re artists first,” Corvus said in an interview with CBC Radio’s Edmonton AM.

“Our industry was all of a sudden in the limelight.”

As interest in the art form grew, getting inked became more accepted, even celebrated. Tattoos began to shed some of their societaltaboos. Celebrities and soccer moms alike displayed their pieces with pride.

As the same time, generic “flash” tattooswere quickly replaced with unique, custom masterpieces and customers began demanding more of their artists, said Corvus.

Tattooing’s surging popularity will be on display at the tattoo convention this weekend, where more than 250 artists will gather to exhibit their work.

“Prior to the early 2000s you didn’t necessarily have to be a great artist to tattoo,” Corvus said.

“If you could learn the machines, you had a steady hands, if you could copy the art off the walls, you could honestly make a pretty good living doing just that.

“It’skind of a whole different era of tattooing.”

After she got her start in the industry, Corvusbegan working in legitimate shops in across Vancouver while she was still in high school. Her “big break” came after she arrived in Edmonton in 2003 and started tattooing full-time.

After more than a decade in the industry, she’s thrilled to see that people from all walks of life now want to turn their bodies into living canvases for custom work like hers.

“You have a whole different generation rising up that want something different, and they have easy access to clean, safe tattooing,” said Corvus.

“Now, everyone’s an artist, and everyone wants custom work because they know it’s out there, and that’s been great. It’s been fantastic.”

Follow this link:
From prison tats to permanent masterpiece: Edmonton tattoo artist buzzing about ink evolution – CBC.ca

Posted in Tattooingwith Comments Off on From prison tats to permanent masterpiece: Edmonton tattoo artist buzzing about ink evolution – CBC.ca



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