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Archive for the ‘Tattooing’

Plattsburgh charged with tattooing teen | Local News … – Plattsburgh Press Republican03.31.17

PLATTSBURGH A Plattsburgh man is accused of illegally tattooing a 15-year-old boy.

Last Friday, Clinton County sheriff’s deputies charged Raymond M. Phillips, 48, with four counts of second-degree unlawfully dealing with a child, a misdemeanor, according to a Sheriff’s Office press release.

The four charges relate to the number of times Phillips is accused of tattooing the teen, Chief Deputy Maj. Michael Reid explained.

According to the State Department of Health, it is illegal to tattoo minors in New York state, regardless of whether or not parental consent is given.

DEPUTY SAW TATTOO

Investigation into the matter began when a deputy assigned as a school resource officer to Beekmantown Central School noticed a student had a tattoo, Reid said.

He then asked a staff member how old the boy was, reportedly identifying Phillips as the probe continued.

Phillips allegedly did the tattoo work out of his residence, and he and the teen met up through word of mouth, Reid said.

It is believed the four separate occasions when he tattooed the boy occurred between March 2015 and the present.

Phillips did not force the teen to get the tattoos, Reid added.

NO MORE CHARGES

Reid did not know how many tattoos Phillips gave the minor andcould not describe what the designs were as that could compromise the student’s identity.

“No more charges are pending, unless obviously something more comes to light,” the major said.

Phillips was issued an appearance ticket for Plattsburgh City Court.

The State Penal Code states that a second-degree unlawfully dealing with a child conviction carries a possible sentence of up to three months in jail.

Email Cara Chapman:

cchapman@pressrepublican.com

Twitter: @PPR_carachapman

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Women and tattoos: A history in ink is on display at Cal State Fullerton – Los Angeles Times03.31.17

Some women look like walking works of art, nearly every inch of torso and limbs covered in tattoos that read like road maps of colors and shapes that beg to be studied. Others opt for a more subtle touch.

That could describe 2017 as well as 1917 and earlier, since tattooing goes back thousands of years.

Over the years, women have seen tattoos as adding to their beauty, making a statement, declaring their independence, honoring a loved one. From members of the upper crust to punk rockers, women have gotten tattooed for a host of reasons.

“For Native American women [of the early 20th century], it was sometimes for aesthetic reasons, but it was also a rite of passage,” said Amy Cohen, who has put together an exhibit of photographs of tattooed women through history. “For wealthy women, it was copying the European nobles.”

For women in the circus in the late 19th century, being tattooed meant having a career where they could travel and earn $100 to $200 each week, a substantial living at the time.

“All these women had a choice in what they had tattooed And in a time when women didn’t always get to make their own choices, I think that’s important,” Cohen said. “I think that for women today, part of the reason for getting tattooed is influenced by the feminist movement and reclaiming their bodies.”

Her “Tattooed and Tenacious: Inked Women in California’s History,” a traveling display from the San Francisco-based nonprofit Exhibit Envoy, is currently at Cal State Fullerton. As part of the college’s museum practicum course, students installed the exhibit, which will be on display until April 23 at the campus’ McCarthy Hall, Room 424.

Cohen, who besides being the show’s original curator is Exhibit Envoy director, assembled “Tattooed and Tenacious” with a focus on the inked women in Native American tribes, the circus performance business and upper-class society.

Almost three years ago, Cohen was searching for topic ideas for her graduate school thesis, wanting something that would be of interest that few people would know about, when inspiration struck. She had worn a sleeveless shirt, revealing her own tattoos, at the Hayward Area Historical Society north of San Jose, where she was interning. Her supervisor suggested the idea of exhibiting tattoos.

The curator discovered the photos for the exhibit through the Library of Congress, archive sources and tattoo artists.

There’s Betty Broadbent, a circus performer and tattoo artist whose more than 350 designs spread from her shoulders down to the frilly ankle socks she is often seen wearing in photographs.

Broadbent who was famously known as the “Tattooed Lady” sought to challenge society’s beauty standards of the time by entering a beauty pageant at the 1939 World’s Fair, her body art on display.

Although she did not win, in 1981 she was the first person inducted into the Tattoo Hall of Fame, which is not a place but rather an honorific list of those who were influential in the world of tattooing.

Olive Oatman, also featured in the touring exhibit, was a teenager when she was given a chin tattoo by a Mohave tribe that she was traded into after the Yavapai kidnapped her during her family’s travels west in 1851.

She received five blue lines on her chin, a common place for California native women to be inked, while living with her Mohave family, who treated her well, according to the exhibit.

Women in high society were said to have tattoos, such as Jeanette “Jennie” Churchill, Winston Churchill’s mother, who was rumored to have had a snake tattoo on her wrist. But the long sleeves and full skirts of the time would often keep such body art secret.

“Tattooed and Tenacious” made its premiere at the Hayward Area Historical Society in 2015, after six months of research.

The show spent several months in Hayward and at the Pasetta House in San Jose, before Cohen met Cal State Fullerton’s museum practicum professor Trish Campbell at a conference and they discussed having “Tattooed and Tenacious” travel to her campus.

Since January, Campbell’s students have worked on installing and promoting the exhibit, which includes not only photos but also a chart of native women’s facial tattoo designs and a mannequin bearing art drawn by six female Bay Area tattoo artists.

To make the exhibit more interactive for guests, the students decided to set up a table where people can color in tattoo outlines printed on paper and a station where they can draw their own tattoo designs on a wall.

“For me, I see it as a mode of expression for women and a means of control over their own bodies, which historically women have not had,” Campbell said of tattoos. “Ultimately, it’s about expression. It’s an art form.”

And for Cohen, who has six tattoos on her arms?

“I got them because like the ideas of certain symbols, like the hourglass. … I like the way it looks, but it’s not there for any specific reason,” Cohen said.

The one tattoo that is meaningful to her, she added, is a wreath with a yellow ribbon, matching a design that was hand-drawn on the mannequin.

“I wanted, in some way, to commemorate the exhibit and start of my career,” she explained.

alexandra.chan@latimes.com

Twitter:@AlexandraChan10

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Q&A: Traditional Hawaiian tattoo expert Keone Nunes on the art of kakau – Hawaiimagazine.com03.31.17

Uhi (Hawaiian tattoo) expert Keone Nunes sits, tattooing one of his four haumana (students) in the roomechoingthe traditions of times long pastas long-time apprentice Keliiokalani Makua observes. The rhythmic tapping of his moli (tattooing needle) inside Waianaes iconic Hale Ola Hoopakolea building is syncopated with the drops of light rain outside. Over the rhythmic beats, Nunes and Makua reflect on their journey so far in reestablishing the cultural significance of kakau (tattooing) and the discipline it takes to maintain the integrity of its sacred meanings.

Nunes: It was kind of interesting because I actually never actively sought out information on kakau, or uhi. I just liked talking story with kupuna (elders). And, interestingly enough, it was them who would bring up uhi in the context of our discussions. We would be talking about hula and things like that, and I would often ask, What did Hawaiians look like before? What was the appearance of Hawaiians? And of course, the uhi was part and parcel of the whole appearance of Hawaiian people in general. So wed have discussions, and I would ask follow-up questions like, What was it done for? What was the significance? Things like that.

Nunes: I had a halau (hula troupe) that I started in 1987 or so. As we were getting ready for a competition, my Auntie Muriel [Lupenui] gave me a pattern that she said would be appropriate for me if I ever wanted to put something on. At that time, I had never thought about it before, but I was thinking that Id like to do things a little bit more traditional. So I started thinking about doing a tattoo on myself using the pattern that she gave menot only as a commitment to the culture, but mainly for myself. It was for me to acknowledge her teachings, as well as [teacher] Darrell Lupenuis teachings, and to do it in a way that was not really popular at that time. It was then that I was challenged to start tattooing by the person who did my first tattoo. I thought about it and realized that I did hold some knowledge that was not commonly known, so I should give it a try.

I never got into tattooing to be a tattooist. I was trying to do something to perpetuate the culture, but I never thought about whether or not it would really catch on. To me, that was never a concern. It was just that this was one aspect of Hawaiian culture that needed to be acknowledged and brought out a little bit more, and I was just trying to do my part in doing that.

Nunes: It took a lot of discipline. Once you start tattooing, everybody and their brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, aunties, uncles, they all want you to do something for them, and it sways you off the path. So it takes a lot of discipline so that you can do what is necessary or what is appropriate for the integrity of the art form.

Makua: People used to come in wanting names tattooed, wanting pictures of things. And we have to tell them, No, thats not what were about. What we do is specific, and where it came from was specific. The reason it was done in the old days was to hoomana (to imbue with spiritual power) them within a spiritual and religious context. Why would we want to take away from that? People dont realize that.

For us haumana to understand where Keones coming from, we had to take a step further to get into an older mindset. Thats why its difficult for a lot of people [who approach Keone] to understand what the heck we are talking about. Its because youre looking at something thats from a time gone by, and youre trying to look at it through the eyes of nowadays. You have to make a switch and cultivate that mindset.

Nunes: The thing that a lot of people dont realize is that Hawaiian tattooists were the only ones who were allowed to spill the blood of alii (royalty) without being killed. And that says something. It was always the tattooist that was in control of the situation, instead of the Western sense where the customer is always right. Regardless, I dont change, because its like Kelii said: Its not about me. Its not about me wanting to be this famous tattoo guy that does all this stuff. Its about perpetuating the culture. And if I make a change, then further down the line, that change is going to become traditional.

Nunes: Over the years, people have been turned away so much from Keone. He says, Nope, do your homework. Look inside you for why you want this. Whats the reason youre going to do this?

Hes done that so many times to so many different people, that, over the years, those people that hes turned awayafter theyve gone through the process and have arrived at the right conclusions and earn the right to get work donethey spread those stories of what it took to others. Those others are coming now with a much more mindful answer to why they want to [get a tattoo], and the reasons are more solid than before.

Makua: Absolutely. [Keone was leaving for a trip once, and our conversation] blew my mind. I told him, I dont feel good about this trip. You cant go. He asked me why. I said, If something happens to you, in a different country so far away, what are we going to do? Ive been doing this uhi thing, and Im pretty good at it, but Im not good like you. And he said, No.If you dont continue, youre slapping me in the face.

And I was like holy crap, you know what I mean? He just put an elephant on my shoulders. I was ready to have a nervous breakdown. And he laughed, and he said, ‘I didnt show you this for nothing. I showed you this for a reason. When Im gone, continue it. Dont let it die.’I owe it to him to never stop. Its become my kuleana (responsibility), and its a lot of pressure.

Nunes: They have a responsibility to see if theres anyone out there ready for that knowledge. Thats always a responsibility. Ive talked to certain kupuna, though, who said that when [they] go, nobodys going to know how to do this or that. And at first, I was like, You know, you have to teach somebody.

But the reality is that a lot of things people are just not ready for or are not willing to accept itor a combination of both. So I understand why people have passed on without sharing [their unique knowledge].

Makua: Dont hesitate at all. Time is of the essence. Those experts didnt become experts overnight, and it takes time to develop it. It takes years of practicing what was given to you to become that expert. And it should be with complete humility.

Nunes: You see, in the end, its not about what the tattoo does for you;its about what you do for your family. To me, [a tattoo] doesnt have to represent an accumulation of the things that you have achieved; it can also be a springboard necessary to get to the things that you want to achieve. The thing that is really important is not who you are but what you can become. That potential is whats most important.

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From prison tats to permanent masterpiece: Edmonton tattoo artist buzzing about ink evolution – CBC.ca03.31.17

When Stephanie Corvus laid down her first line of ink, tattoos were still for outcasts.

She was 15 when her uncle,just out of prison,offered to share one of the skills he’d picked up behind bars.

“He taught me to build rotary machines, it’s the same style of machine that they build in jail, and I started tattooing all my high school friends out of my basement,” said Corvus, a custom tattoo artist who will be showcasing her work at the Edmonton Tattoo and Arts Festivalthis weekend.

Stephanie Corvus is a custom tattoo artist in Edmonton. (Stephanie Corvus/Facebook)

“Not really the way that you you want to start, but that was at the tail end of a different era.”

Tattoo cultureand Corvus’s careerhave both come a long way since then.

When she first started working in the industry, the stigma around tattoos was immense, Corvus said. Even her “biker”mother was horrified to learn of her career aspirations.

“When my mom found out I was a tattoo artist, she literally said to me, ‘But only hookers and sailors get tattoos,’ and this is my mom who rides a Harley,” said Corvus, a resident artist at Red Loon Tattoo and Piercing in Edmonton.

“Even among that group there was still a strong stigma, especially against women having and doing tattoos.”

The industry has experienced a paradigm shift. The proliferation of reality television series such as LA Ink, which profiled celebritytattoo artists like Kat Von D, brought the industry out of the underground, said Corvus.

“It was kind of the end of the outlaw era of tattooing where you couldn’t go into a tattoo shop and ask a ton of questions because they would kick you out, whereas now, we’re artists first,” Corvus said in an interview with CBC Radio’s Edmonton AM.

“Our industry was all of a sudden in the limelight.”

As interest in the art form grew, getting inked became more accepted, even celebrated. Tattoos began to shed some of their societaltaboos. Celebrities and soccer moms alike displayed their pieces with pride.

As the same time, generic “flash” tattooswere quickly replaced with unique, custom masterpieces and customers began demanding more of their artists, said Corvus.

Tattooing’s surging popularity will be on display at the tattoo convention this weekend, where more than 250 artists will gather to exhibit their work.

“Prior to the early 2000s you didn’t necessarily have to be a great artist to tattoo,” Corvus said.

“If you could learn the machines, you had a steady hands, if you could copy the art off the walls, you could honestly make a pretty good living doing just that.

“It’skind of a whole different era of tattooing.”

After she got her start in the industry, Corvusbegan working in legitimate shops in across Vancouver while she was still in high school. Her “big break” came after she arrived in Edmonton in 2003 and started tattooing full-time.

After more than a decade in the industry, she’s thrilled to see that people from all walks of life now want to turn their bodies into living canvases for custom work like hers.

“You have a whole different generation rising up that want something different, and they have easy access to clean, safe tattooing,” said Corvus.

“Now, everyone’s an artist, and everyone wants custom work because they know it’s out there, and that’s been great. It’s been fantastic.”

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Tattooed New York – Brooklyn Rail03.31.17

New York Historical Society | February 3 April 30, 2017

Did you know United States President Teddy Roosevelt had a tat? This and other peculiar facts abound at the New York Historical Societys 300-year purview of this ancient and universal art form as practiced in the city and its surrounding regions. Over the centuries, tattooing in New York City appears to have had wide swings in its degree of acceptance, but has never been culturally lost. As well as tracking the lives of tattoo artists, their customers, tools and techniques, and eras of changing designs, the exhibition also holds up a mirror to shifting populations of New Yorkers, class divisions, and perhaps most tellingly, the roles expected of womenwhose bodies have typically borne the brunt of Americas deep ambivalence toward sexuality. Unfortunately, the exhibit, evidently biting off more that it can chew, suffers from a number of gaps that give the overall experience a disjointed feel, particularly at the beginning and end of the historical timeline, but the materials portraying and documenting the growth of the industry during the late 19th and early 20th centuries is strong.

New Yorks original native population is represented here in four mezzotints of the so-called Indian Kingsthree Mohawks and one Mohicanwho traveled to England requesting military aid against the French and their native allies. These prints of Native Americans with patterns tattooed on their faces, chests, and limbs are copies made by the English printmaker John Simon, of four paintings from the hand of Dutchman John Verelst, all dated 1710. The images both idealize and exoticize their subjects, to satisfy Europeans appetite for novelty. No doubt the English and Dutch settlers of New York City would have considered such practices unfit for God-fearing Christian men.

From the Indian Kings of the early 18th century, the timeline jumps to sailors tattoos in the early 19th century (indigenous tattoo practices not re-emerging until a later discussion of contemporary tattoo artists). English sailors, due to contact with cultures in the Pacific Islands during the 1700sthe word tattoo comes from the Tahitian word tatauwere among the first Europeans to adopt tattooing. As American whalers spread into the Pacific in the 1800s, they began to emulate their British counterparts. As a practical matter, tattoos made useful identification marks, which the sailor could use in legal documents. Tattoos also served as signs of sailors achievements: a dragon tattoo meant a sailor had traveled to China, or a full-rigged ship (a boat with three or more square-sailed masts) meant he had sailed around Cape Horn. Given the dangers of a sailors life, tattoos also served an apotropaic function: a compass rose tattoo meant a sailor would always return home. The flashink and watercolor designs of tattoo templatesfrom this period included women in various degrees of undress, flags, butterflies, daggers, and so forth.

By the Civil War era, soldiers were also using tattoos for identification. One of the earliest known artists, Martin Hildebrandt, who set up New Yorks first tattoo parlor in 1859 on the Bowerywhat became the ground zero for the citys tattoo tradetattooed the names of thousands of Confederate and Union soldiers on arms and chests using a hand-poking technique. By 1891, with the invention of Samuel OReillys electric rotary tattoo machine, almost every barbershop from lower Manhattan to Coney Island had a tattoo artist working out of the back room.

The late 19th century also saw the rise of professional tattooed women who were staples of circus sideshows, offering women a career and rare financial independence. Simultaneously, fashionable women, following trends from Europe (veritably Winston Churchills mother discretely kept her wrist tattoo hidden under a bracelet), began to sport Japanese-style designs of dragons and birds inked by Hori Chiyo, the Shakespeare of tattooing. In 1939, covered in 565-plus tattoos, Betty Broadbent challenged traditional norms of beauty by competing in the first televised beauty pageant. However, with the rise of new technologies and affordability, the industry saw a decline in tattooing as a fad for the wealthy, and by the 1950s was more associated with bikers and criminals.

In 1961, under the pretext of protecting people from hepatitis, New York City banned tattooing for three decades, forcing tattoo artists to either go underground or move outside the city limits. In 1979, however, tattooing was cast in a new light of high art with the publication Pushing Ink, The Fine Art of Tattooing by artist Spider Webb (Joseph OSullivan), which documented his use of tattoos as conceptual art. Clearly the adoption of tattooing as a counter-cultural practice by the punk wave in the 80s, which had strong inroads to New York Citys artistic communities, must have been a factor in the evolution, but that connection gets scant development within the exhibition. New York City finally lifted the ban on tattoo parlors in 1997, ushering in an era in which tattooing merged and developed with the rest of the citys art and design worlds.

Among the contemporary artists featured at the end of the show, Ruth Martens Marquesan Heads (1977), an enamel painting on masonite, nicely brings the historical narrative full circle with illustrated facial tattoos of the natives from that island, recalling the mezzotints of the Indian Kings. There is also a very moving wall of photographs of women who have chosen to get their mastectomies decorated with tattoos rather than get reconstructive surgery. All in all though, Tattooed New York would have benefited from more thoroughly connecting the dots across its timeline, in particular from the tattoos outlaw status to the widely accepted practice we see today.

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Plattsburgh man charged with tattooing teen – Plattsburgh Press Republican03.30.17

PLATTSBURGH A Plattsburgh man is accused of illegally tattooing a 15-year-old boy.

Last Friday, Clinton County sheriff’s deputies charged Raymond M. Phillips, 48, with four counts of second-degree unlawfully dealing with a child, a misdemeanor, according to a Sheriff’s Office press release.

The four charges relate to the number of times Phillips is accused of tattooing the teen, Chief Deputy Maj. Michael Reid explained.

According to the State Department of Health, it is illegal to tattoo minors in New York state, regardless of whether or not parental consent is given.

DEPUTY SAW TATTOO

Investigation into the matter began when a deputy assigned as a school resource officer to Beekmantown Central School noticed a student had a tattoo, Reid said.

He then asked a staff member how old the boy was, reportedly identifying Phillips as the probe continued.

Phillips allegedly did the tattoo work out of his residence, and he and the teen met up through word of mouth, Reid said.

It is believed the four separate occasions when he tattooed the boy occurred between March 2015 and the present.

Phillips did not force the teen to get the tattoos, Reid added.

NO MORE CHARGES

Reid did not know how many tattoos Phillips gave the minor andcould not describe what the designs were as that could compromise the student’s identity.

“No more charges are pending, unless obviously something more comes to light,” the major said.

Phillips was issued an appearance ticket for Plattsburgh City Court.

The State Penal Code states that a second-degree unlawfully dealing with a child conviction carries a possible sentence of up to three months in jail.

Email Cara Chapman:

cchapman@pressrepublican.com

Twitter: @PPR_carachapman

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Freckle Tattoos Are Now A Thing And We Are A Little Freaked Out – YourTango03.29.17

Is this for real?

Lip fillers, microblading, and now freckle tattoos?

No seriously,freckles tattoos are a thing, and it’s the recent beauty trend that young women seem to be jumping on board with.

Freckles used to be looked at as an imperfection, but now everybody wants them!

In the video above, the tattoo artist explains the tattoos are will eventually fade with over time. According to this article from The New York Times, freckle tattoos use pigment in lieu of ink, can last up to three years and cost about $250.

In the same article, tattoo artist Gabrielle Rainbow explains, “Id say for freckles, its clients who naturally will get some in the summertime with sun exposure, but want them yearlong.” The Montreal-based tattoo artiststarted first experimented with tattooing freckles after seeing her friend having difficulty painting them on.

She told beauty publication NewBeauty that, “Ireally dont recommend tattooing your own face, but once I saw that it worked out, and I liked the effect, I decided to do hers.

But you also have the option of freckle stencils for those who don’t wanna go down the tattoo route.

So ok like I guess they’re cute and all but honestly I don’t get it.

Women get breast implants because theywant bigger boobs, or get rhinoplasty’sbecause they think their nose is too big (or maybe that’s just me), but adding freckles to your face is … different.

But who are we to judge, it’s not OURface, if you want freckles on your face, go for it!

Maybe try the stencils first to be sure you’ll even like the look before going for the longer-lasting look.

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Companies need to respect tattoos – Northwest Missourian03.29.17

For todays Millennials, tattoos have become one of the most expressed and popular art forms. The artistry of some tattoos are equivalent to live action portraits. Tattoos even hold symbolic and even emotional value.

These creative inks are not what they used to be. They are self-expressions for the soul-searching generation.

While some employers have embraced tattoos and self-expression, there are some companies that still associate tattoos with unprofessionalism and poor appearance. Tattoos have become a significant part of the Millennial culture and are works of pride, so is it really fair to penalize job-searching college graduates for their artistic creativity?

It is no secret that tattoos have gotten a bad reputation, being associated with criminal or violent activity. Getting a tattoo is considered an at-risk-behavior for adolescents. This is the a big difference between Baby Boomers and Millennials. Millennials have embraced tattooing while Boomers are unsupportive of the artistry.

In the study Body Art, Deviance, and American College Students, Jerome Koch, a sociology professor at Texas Tech University, stated individuals who have heavy ink done are more prone to having involvement in illegal drug use and binge drinking.

With studies like these circulating the internet, inked young adults will continue to draw the short end of the stick when it comes to acceptance in professional settings.

Tattoos in professional settings can have their benefits. Ink promotes creativity in the workplace; this creativity will allow employees to think outside the box, especially for those who go into the fashion industry. Tattoos can inspire individuals to experiment with their own property; their property being their own bodies.

A survey conducted by Aaron Gouveia, a contributing writer of salary.com, showed that in a sample of 2,700 people, 43 percent believed tattoos reflect that poor employment and preconceived prejudices is stunting the furthering of fresh graduates in their careers.

Self-expression is the ultimate motivator, and the negative reputation of tattoos should no longer be a factor. Millennials motivation behind their tattoos is culturally influenced. Employers should look at whether the person has the potential ability to perform the job.

However, this is not the case in most situations. This unethical bias has led to discrimination against people with tattoos or other bodily alterations. According to CareerBuilder, tattoos are the third most likely factor to affect ones career.

More maturity needs to be established about the appearances of others. In a judgmental society, the process of treating individuals fairly will be just as challenging as promoting acceptance of any civil right.

According to a Pew Research Survey, 40 percent of Millennials have tattoos and plan on getting more. It is time to change the perception of tattoo in the professional world. With the difficulties in some fields of finding a job after college graduation, new graduates should not have to worry if their free expression through their bodies will affect their chances of finding a job.

An open door policy on tattoos would be much appreciated from members of the tattooed community.

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Dion Kaszas draws inspiration from ancient tattooing techniques – City Pulse03.28.17

MONDAY, March 27 To innovate his tattoo work, artist Dion Kaszas looked to the past.

In 2012, while pursuing a degree in indigenous studies at the University of British Columbia Okanagan in Kelowna, British Columbia, Kaszas, whose heritage includes indigenous Canadians, was awarded research funds to indigenous tattooing. While researching his ancestors tattooing methods, he discovered hand poke and skin stitching methods. Hand poking pushes ink underneath the skin one dot at a time to create delicate designs. In skin stitching, the needle runs through the top layer of skin like a sewing needle. Both methods predate the electric tattoo machine that Kaszas first learned the craft on.

I get bored easily, so the variety of the three styles help keep me stimulated, Kaszas said. All three present different results. In skin stitching, you have much less control and never know how the ink reacts underneath the skin, and tattooing by hand takes a lot of time.

Kaszas, 39, has been tattooing professionally since 2009. He works at Vertigo Tattoos and Body Piercing in Salmon Arm, British Columbia, where he was mentored by Carla Gosgnach, the owner of the shop since 1998. Kaszas will present a lecture tonight at MSUs Lookout! Art Gallery, and will demonstrate his techniques tomorrow.

When Kaszas first started using indigenous tattooing techniques, he could only find about three people using the skin stitching method.

I hear people saying that I am one of the leaders of indigenous tattooing, Kaszas said.

Last year, Kaszas taught indigenous tattooing at the University of British Columbia Okanagan.

Four students came for a month long residency, he said. I taught the different techniques and about health.

Later this year, Kaszas will travel to several tattoo conventions and cultural events. He will also return to the University of British Columbia Okanagan for another month-long teaching residency. His use of indigenous techniques, he explained, goes beyond artistic concerns.

The revival of indigenous tattooing is about remembering who we are as indigenous people while embodying the tattooing of our ancestors, he said. Its a process of remembering who we are as indigenous people, a process of remembering our ancestral communities and a process of healing individuals and revitalizing our cultures.

Dion Kaszas

Lecture

7 p.m. Monday, March 27

FREE

Performance

6 p.m. Tuesday, March 28

FREE

Lookout! Art Gallery

Snyder-Phillips Hall

362 Bogue St., East Lansing

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Celebrating Pasifika the art of Samoan female tattooing – Asia Pacific Report03.26.17

By Kendall Hutt

A small, enthusiastic crowd gathered amongst the shelves of one of Aucklands libraries earlier this week to listen to a lively and engaging talk on the practice of malu, the Samoan female tattoo.

The event, part of Papatoetoe Librarys regular Tea and Topic programme, was organised to celebrate Pasifika, when every March the diversity of cultures throughout the Pacific region is marked.

The talk was delivered by Leota Alice Meredith, a Samoan-New Zealander who discovered an appreciation for her home culture when she travelled to Samoa in her early 20s.

Her motivation behind the talk was giving back to community.

Meredith acknowledged she was not only inspired to speak about the malu, but to give her audience an opportunity to learn more about the Pacific and its people.

Im sure you have questions in regards to Pacific people and their mannerisms. I mean, look at what Im wearing, she laughed with her audience.

Main print Meredith described the malu, Samoas female tattoo, as the main print or tattoo on the back of the legs and readily showed off her own.

Thank goodness, I managed to remember to shave my legs this morning.

Tattooed in 1995 by the late Sua Suluape Paulo who was considered a master of his art Meredith admitted she got through the four-hour ordeal by listening to the radio on her Walkman.

Meredith highlighted how the process of traditional tattooing involved three apprentices to the tattooist, some who begin training as young as seven or eight years.

You learn by observation, so the sooner the better. The first of these apprentices or assistants is responsible for pulling the skin taught so the tattooists tool bounces cleanly, while the second is responsible for diligently wiping away the blood.

The third assistant, Meredith jokingly added, was capturing the tattooists ashes from the constant train of cigarettes he supplied Paulo.

She outlined how the mix of blood and water, a result of cleaning the malu, was not a pleasant smell for Paulo, while cigarette smoke was.

But when asked by one audience member if it was painful, Meredith replied:

I wasnt going to stop Oh, yes, four hours and I was lucky. I wasnt going to stop. As soon as he started I knew I wasnt stopping. Because I knew if I stopped, that might be game over before you know it, and I was very adamant I did not want to wear tights for the rest of my life.

But, as Meredith explained, the malu is not as painful as the male equivalent.

This is because the final part of the male tatau, or tattoo, consists of tattooing into the navel, which holds much spiritual significance because the umbilical cord symbolises life.

Importantly, malu also involves a journey, a journey Meredith explained must not be done alone.

With the tattooing, you always go in partnerships. Theres always a pair of you. They say you dont tattoo by yourself. Its because when you journey through anything that is painful, you dont journey alone. Its something in all of us, in life in general.

Malu also involves the ritual of cracking an egg over ones head upon the tattoos completion as a sign of renewal, Meredith said.

Meredith also explained to the audience the numerous traditions and norms behind Samoas rich tattooing history, led by two families Sa Sua and Sa Tuluoena.

Revived the art The Sua family literally revived the art of traditional Pacific tattooing, in the world, Meredith said.

She also not only described how there are certain times to display the malu less one becomes cursed but how the female tattoo in the past involved a certain hierarchy.

Originally, only a chiefs daughter could have the malu.

But, inevitably, as time has passed, the malu and tatau itself has evolved.

Meredith explained how this has largely come due to the introduction of health regulations, which has seen the turtle shell and bone of traditional tools replaced with titanium.

Debate has also raged about whether non-Samoans are entitled to bear the malu and tatau, and if women are entitled to wear male tattoos and vice versa, a debate Meredith chalked down to pushing boundaries.

She could see where traditionalists were coming from, however.

Were surrounded by cultural protocols in order to map our cultural significance.

Kendall Hutt is the Pacific Media Centres Pacific Media Watch contributing editor.

Continued here:
Celebrating Pasifika the art of Samoan female tattooing – Asia Pacific Report

Posted in Tattooingwith Comments Off on Celebrating Pasifika the art of Samoan female tattooing – Asia Pacific Report



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