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Archive for the ‘Tattooist’

Dr Evil tattooist given 3 years in jail over tongue …05.25.19

A tattooist known as Dr Evil who removed nipples and performed tongue splitting on clients has been jailed after an ear removal sparked an investigation that resulted in a 40-month jail sentence.

Dr Evil, real name Brendan McCarthy, was sentenced to three years and four months for carrying out procedures such as ear and nipple removals at his studio in Wolverhampton between 2012 and 2015. The controversial modifications were carried out without anaesthetic.

West Midlands Police started an investigation into the tattooist when images of McCarthy cutting off a customers ear circulated online, sparking complaints to the City of Wolverhampton Council.

WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES

McCarthy pled guilty to three counts of causing grievous bodily harm at the Wolverhampton Crown Court last month and was sentenced on Thursday. Media reports state that he screamed when his sentence was read out, and many of his supporters in the court cried.

He had no qualifications to carry out surgical procedures or to deal with any adverse consequences which could have arisen, Judge Amjad Nawaz said. There is a clear public interest element. There is also a need for deterrent.

When he was arrested, McCarthy said he didnt think he had broken the law because his clients had consented to the procedures. He has no medical qualifications and is licensed to carry out piercings and tattoos. Police said he did the modifications without knowing his clients medical or mental health backgrounds, and that they found out-of-date swabs, anaesthetic gel and needles at his studio.

We all gave full consent, we were all happy, he talked us through the procedure, we knew he wasn’t a doctor despite playing on the Austin powers name of Dr Evil, he’s one of the best in the country I had multiple discussions with him about how the industry needs regulation, one of his customers said.

Ezechiel Lott, the man whose ear removal sparked the investigation, told police he hadn’t realised the procedure wasnt legal and felt deceived.

READ MORE: Stag party paid drunk and hungry homeless man to tattoo name & postcode on forehead (VIDEO)

Over 13,000 people signed a petition in support of McCarthy, whose lawyers argued the consent he got from clients was a lawful defense. His case was brought to the Court of Appeal but three judges found the procedures were not the same as tattoos and piercings.

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Tattoo – Wikipedia – Daily Tattooist News From Around the …05.17.19

22 A bit over decade ago Chad Stewart gave me my second tattoo, and really the only one that I give a damn about anymore.What started out as an extra terrible, half-baked and impulsive idea (Aztec calendar backpiece anyone?) turned into a pure, authentic, love-based and completely hand-sketched piece (my great grandparents names in traditional Chicano style lettering, with a beautiful turquoise, coral and silver feather ring that my mom gave me as the centerpiece) that Ill be proud of until the day I die.We did the whole thing in one go, it took several hours, and I enjoyed every minute of it. From the thoughtful planning back-and-forth prior to the session, the session itself, the multitude of cigarette breaks, the fun, shit-talking banter, Lil Tommy chiming in and checking on me, Chads steady hand and complete consideration and care, the whole thing was good feels.Despite my totally reckless lack of proper tattoo care (I was back in the sun and in the lake all day every day less than a week later), this tattoo is still solid, and I still get compliments and questions about it all the time.This is the cream of the crop for ink in Charlotte

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz Summary & Study Guide04.08.19

The Tattooist of Auschwitz Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis tohelp you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

This detailed literature summary also contains Quotes and a Free Quiz onThe Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris.

The following version of this book was used to create this study guide: Morris, Heather. The Tattooist of Auschwitz. New York: Harper, 2018.

Heather Morriss novel opens in the Auschwitz concentration camp during WWII, as a young man named Lale tattoos the number 34902 onto the arm of a young women. As their eyes meet, he is instantly smitten. The story then recedes in time to show Lales journey to this pointhow he arrived at Auschwitz Two-Birkenau in April 1942 along with countless other terrified young Slovakian Jewish men, how he suffered from Typhus fever and only survived because of the kindness of his bunkmates, and how he became an apprentice to Pepan, the tattooist responsible for inscribing unique identification numbers into the skin of each new prisoner. By July, Lale and Pepan have tattooed the arms of countless new prisoners and Lale has vowed that he will resist the Nazis by surviving the camp. At this point, the novel has come full circle and the scene described in the prologue is repeated again word for word; Lale tattoos prisoner 34902 and falls in love with her at first sight.

After Pepan mysteriously disappears, Lale is promoted to head Ttowierer and receives privileges such as better lodgings and extra rations, which he kindly distributes to fellow prisoners. Over time, Lale develops a complicated sort of friendship with Baretski, the young guard that keeps watch over him (and has the authority to end his life at any moment). He is crude and violent, yet he is humanized by being characterized as uneducated and by being given a sympathetic backstory. With the help of Baretski, Lale writes to the beautiful young prisoner he encountered, and they finally meet. He learns that her name is Gita, but she refuses to tell him her surname or her hometown; she has lost hope for her future and thinks of herself only as prisoner 34902 of Birkenau. Their relationship quickly evolves into a passionate love affair and Lale encourages Gita to believe in their future together; their love gives them the motivation that they need to survive, and they become integral to each others happiness. They watch over one another, and offer each other the support, help, and comfort that each of them needs.

Industrious and bold, Lale creates a network of smugglers within Auschwitz: the girls that sort through the prisoners confiscated goods bring him jewels, he uses these jewels to pay village laborers that sneak in food and medicine for him, which he in turn uses as currency for bribery and distributes among those in need. The working and living conditions at Auschwitz are horrendous and Lale is stupefied by the way that human beings are treated at the hands of the SS that oversee the concentration and extermination camp. The prisoners are worked like slaves building new blocks and crematorium and Lale witnesses the extermination of countless innocent lives within the camps walls.

A large group of Romany people are brought to the camp and they are lodged in Lales block. This becomes known as the Gypsy camp and Lale is fascinated by their nomadic lifestyle and becomes an honorary member of this close-knit community. They begin to feel like an extended family to him. Meanwhile, Lale becomes acquainted with the sickeningly cruel Doctor Mengele, who inspects each prisoner to determine their fate, selecting who will be put to work, who will be useful for human experimentation, and who should be extinguished right away.

When the SS guards discover Lale has been hoarding smuggled jewels and food under his mattress he is tossed into an interrogation cell, beaten, and imprisoned. Due to the connections he has made and the kindness he has shown to others he manages to escape execution, and after a stint working as a laborer he secures his old job again and resumes his previous routine. He is devastated when he discovers that the Gypsy camp has been emptied and that the men, women, and children he had come to consider family have all been murdered.

Finally, after two and a half years of excruciating life at Birkenau, witnessing the worst of humanity, rumors of an uprising circulate and when news reaches the camp of the advancing Russian army the SS officers hurry to destroy their records and transfer the prisoners. Gita is marched out of the gates with thousands of other female prisoners and just on time shouts back to Lale that her full name is Gita Furman and that she loves him. She escapes from the guards, finds refuge in a nearby village, and eventually makes her way to Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, where she joins other camp survivors. Meanwhile, Lale finds himself on a train on its way to another labor camp. He escapes through the forest and a freezing river, only to be captured by Russian soldiers and forced to work for them as their pimp. After several weeks he is able to gain their trust and uses this as an opportunity to escape. He makes his way to Bratislava. Time stands still as Gita and Lale cross paths on the street and recognize each other. The story closes as Lale asks Gita to marry him and they walk away, one young couple among many in a war-ravaged city.

After the story closes, the authors voice takes over the narrative voice and she provides a historical note that gives the readers an overview of the lives of Lale and Gita, two real Holocaust survivors that this fictional account is based on. After the war, they married, had a child named Gary, and immigrated to Melbourne. To conclude, an afterword written by Gary himself provides a moving first-hand testament to the love he witnessed between his parents growing up.

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Yorkshire Pudding: Tattooist04.08.19

Recently I finished reading “The Tattooist of Auschwitz” by Heather Morris. As the title perhaps suggests, it’s about someone who was responsible for tattooing numbers on the wrists of new prisoners arriving in that Nazi hellhole. The tattooist was a prisoner called Lale Sokolov and the book is imaginatively based upon his true life story.

Heather Morris teased out the story from the man himself. He had settled in Melbourne, Australia after the war, building a new life with his wife – Gita Furman who was also incarcerated in that inhuman nightmare of a place.

I was looking forward to turning the pages and the book was certainly easy to read but for me it lacked the harsh authenticity I had been expecting. It was just too damned comfortable. Where were the moments that ought to elicit tears? Where were the moments to make you turn your head away from the text and shake your head in sheer disbelief?

The way that Lale and Gita were able to conduct their relationship – well for me it made it seem that Auschwitz was rather like a holiday camp. It was just too easy.

I am sure that in reality Lale and Gita went through a terrible time of fear, physical deprivation, cruelty and uncertainty. Another writer – someone different from Heather Morris – could have made their true story really bite, really hurt, really resound in one’s memory. However, there was something about Heather Morris’s telling of the tale that made it all seem too sweet, too flaming nice.

Though it always held my attention, “The Tattooist of Auschwitz” failed to disturb me and I am sorry about that. I think that Lale Sokolov’s tale deserved a more poignant telling in honour of the thousands who were so cruelly eliminated – when ordinary men did such terrible things.

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Amazon.com: The Tattooist of Auschwitz: A Novel eBook …04.08.19

The #1 International Bestseller & New York Times Bestseller

This beautiful, illuminating tale of hope and courage is based on interviews that were conducted with Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolovan unforgettable love story in the midst of atrocity.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz is an extraordinary document, a story about the extremes of human behavior existing side by side: calculated brutality alongside impulsive and selfless acts of love. I find it hard to imagine anyone who would not be drawn in, confronted and moved. I would recommend it unreservedly to anyone, whether theyd read a hundred Holocaust stories or none.Graeme Simsion, internationally-bestselling author of The Rosie Project

In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Ttowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners.

Imprisoned for over two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarismbut also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive.

One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her.

A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov’s experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions.

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Book Marks reviews of The Tattooist of Auschwitz by …04.06.19

Its a triumphant account with a resourceful, bold, and charismatic hero who eludes death time and again. Adding to its cinematic potential is the fact that The Tattooist of Auschwitz is chiefly a love story … And yet, and yet: there is nevertheless something incongruous about this story of survival being framed as an Auschwitz romance … Morris, in her debut, has created a fast-paced narrative, filled with drama and suspense, and there are passages that are genuinely moving. But one wonders what Lales story would have looked like as a work of biography or as a more complex work of literary fiction … It is often said that words arent up to the task of conveying the horrors of atrocities like the Holocaust; at times, Morriss prose, lapsing into cliche, doesnt come close … Some of the most complicated aspects of Lales years at Auschwitz are alluded to primarily in dialogue, leaving them largely unexamined … In this well-intentioned but flawed work, she has succeeded in telling a remarkable story, if not in excavating its wrenching complexities.

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz – Heather Morris – Paperback03.16.19

#1 New York Times Bestseller and #1 International Bestseller

This beautiful, illuminating tale of hope and courage is based on interviews that were conducted with Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolovan unforgettable love story in the midst of atrocity.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz is an extraordinary document, a story about the extremes of human behavior existing side by side: calculated brutality alongside impulsive and selfless acts of love. I find it hard to imagine anyone who would not be drawn in, confronted and moved. I would recommend it unreservedly to anyone, whether theyd read a hundred Holocaust stories or none.Graeme Simsion, internationally-bestselling author of The Rosie Project

In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Ttowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners.

Imprisoned for over two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarismbut also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive.

One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her.

A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov’s experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions.

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Lale Sokolov – Wikipedia03.09.19

Ludwig “Lale” Sokolov (n Eisenberg; 19162006) was an Austro-Hungarian-born Slovak-Australian businessman and Holocaust survivor. He was Jewish, and having been sent to Auschwitz in 1942, served as the concentration camp’s tatowierer (tattooist) until the camp was liberated near the end of World War II. He did not speak publicly about his wartime experiences until after the death of his wife in 2003 due to fears of being perceived as a Nazi collaborator.[1][2]

He was born in Korompa, Kingdom of Hungary (now Krompachy[1], Slovakia), on 28 October 1916[2]. In April 1942, Sokolov was part of the transport of Jewish prisoners to Auschwitz.[1] Upon arrival, he was tattooed with the number 32407.[1] He was set to work constructing housing blocks for the expanding camp but soon became ill with typhoid.[2] Having recovered, he became the assistant to Pepan, the then tetovierer (tattooist) of the camp.[2] Pepan “disappeared” roughly four weeks later and Sokolov took over as the tetovierer.[1] As such, he joined the Politische Abteilung and had an SS officer assigned to monitor him.[2] His job meant he was “a step further away from death than the other prisoners”, and he received a number of benefits such as a single room, extra rations, and free time when his work had been completed.[2]

Lale met Gisela “Gita” Furman in July 1942 while tattooing an all-female group of new arrivals:[1] he tattooed Gita with the number 34902.[2] He had used his relatively privileged position to keep her alive by sending her extra food and messages through his personal guard, and having her “moved to a better work station”.[1][2] He was also involved in trading contraband (including jewellery) that was given to him by fellow prisoners, with locals in return for food and provisions.[2]

Two days before the liberation of Auschwitz by Soviet troops (on 27 January 1945), Sokolov was moved to the Mauthausen-Gusen concentration camp.[1] He escaped that concentration camp, and returned to his native place, then part of Czechoslovakia.[1][2] Knowing only Gita Fuhrmannova’s name, he went to Bratislava, the main entry point for returning survivors, to search for her.[2] After weeks of searching, she stepped out into the street in front of his horse.[2] The couple married in 1945, and he changed his surname from Eisenberg to the more Russian-sounding Sokolov.[2] He then opened a factory in Bratislava.[1][2] During this time, he was involved in collecting money in support of the creation of the State of Israel.[2] This activity and the nationalisation of industry by the country’s communist government, resulted in him being imprisoned and having his business seized.[2] He was soon released and the couple emigrated to Australia in 1948.[1]

In Australia, Sokolov and his wife settled in Melbourne and opened up a clothing factory.[1] Their only child, Gary, was born in 1961.[2] Though his wife visited Europe a number of times, Sokolov never returned.[2] Following Gita’s death in 2003, he finally felt able to speak about his war-time experience having feared that he would be perceived as a collaborator.[1][2] He was interviewed by Heather Morris over the next three years, and she wrote a book about his life, which was published in 2018.[2] He died in 2006, and is survived by his son.[2]

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Amy C. Duncan03.06.19

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MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA

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Heather Morris Official Author Page03.06.19

Author

The Tattooist of AuschwitzFebruary 1, 2018, Echo (Bonnier Publishing Australia)

In December 2003, I was introduced to Lale Sokolov. His wife had recently died and I was told he had a story that might be worth telling. That was the first of many, many days I would spend with the Ttowierer, the tattooist of Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Lale’s life was forever changed the day he looked into the eyes of a young girl, as he tattooed her left arm. In return, as he told me, she tattooed her love into his heart.

What I got from Lale was a love story set in the horrific world of the Holocaust. The possibility of survival for our lovers was remote. But prisoners 32407 and 34902 did survive. They survived a place now etched in history as a Dante-esque circle of hell; they survived a death march; they were separated, reunited; they married and lived happily in Melbourne, Australia, for 58 years.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz is the story of Lale and Gita.

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