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Archive for the ‘Maine Tattoo’

Old-fashioned sailor tattoos inspired this student art show at Husson University – Bangor Daily News11.13.21

Before there were the intricate designs you see in contemporary tattoos all over the world, there was Sailor Jerry, aka Norman Collins,a tattooist in the mid-20th century who almost single-handedly inspired the modern profession of tattooing.

Husson University students in adjunct instructor Kat Johnsons mixed media class have used Sailor Jerrys designs as inspiration for an art installation now on display in Hussons Robert E. White Gallery. The students created their own designs inspired by Sailor Jerry, whose iconic images of stars, anchors, birds, hearts, ships and pin-up girls helped pave the way for todays tattooing industry.

Johnson, an artist in the Bangor area, knew she wanted to do a wheatpasting project with her students, a medium shes long worked in as a regular contributor to the Downtown Bangor Wheatpaste Project. She envisioned each student coming up with their own design, to be printed and wheat pasted on the gallery wall.

With so many designs in one space, she thought it might look like a tattoo sleeve, which is often a mix of interrelated images and designs all tattooed on half or all of a persons arm.

As we live in Maine with a strong maritime history, the tattoo idea worked well with our shared culture, Johnson said. Immediately Sailor Jerry came to mind. His bold line work and signature value coloring were two strong formal qualities I could teach to the students during the process. These elements combined made Sailor Jerry a perfect fit.

Tattoo as an art form has its roots in ancient Austronesian people, who developed the original stick-and-poke tattoo method, using a mallet and a piercing implement. In the U.S., however, tattooing got its start in 19th-century army camps and sailing ports, where itinerant tattoo artists would travel and tattoo soldiers, sailors and criminals, with designs meant to symbolize their experiences on the sea, in battle and in jail.

Sailor Jerrys style came directly out of that tradition albeit with more polish and refinement and many of those designs are still popular tattoos that people get today.

Anchors Aweigh, the tattoo design installation, will be on display through Dec. 7 in the Robert E. White Gallery in Peabody Hall on the Husson University campus in Bangor.

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Bypassing the ‘headache of downtown,’ food businesses gravitate toward Forest Avenue – Press Herald11.02.21

On, or just off, the indistinguishable 1.4-mile stretch of outer Forest Avenue that lies between Woodfords Corner and Morrills Corner amid the hair salons and nail salons; the car washes and dog washes; the Asian, Arab and African markets; the storefront churches; the tattoo parlors; and the modest eateries a small cluster of new food businesses have opened, or are set to open, perhaps signaling a shift for a pocket of Portland that is more often seen as a thruway than as a destination.

Just this year, a Speckled Ax coffee production facility, Falafel Time, Coveside Coffee and Pizzaiolo Bar & Grille have opened; Friendly Discount beverage has morphed into Back Bay Superette; Bingas Wingas has announced plans to move to outer Forest Avenue; and Belleville bakery has secured a location for a production kitchen.

SPACE TO PRODUCE

Within the last six years, Rosemont Market opened its production facility on Stevens Avenue, a mere locally farmed Brussels sprouts throw from Morrills Corner; Otto Pizza opened a nearby delivery hub and restaurant on Read Street; Paella Seafood opened (now temporarily closed because of a building fire); and Bird & Co. began to welcome crowds near longtime Woodfords Corner success stories Bayou Kitchen and Big Sky Bread.

Food entrepreneurs, incidentally, arent the only business people to show interest in the neighborhood; three cannabis shops are in the works for immediately north of Woodfords Corner alone, and a fourth already has opened.

The new food businesses say they are drawn to the area by less expensive rents (though prices are already edging up, according to realtors and business owners), available production space, plentiful parking, proximity to the Portland peninsula, potential for new customers in underserved neighborhoods; and, in at least a few cases, the thing that drives most other people crazy about outer Forest Avenue the traffic.

Another factor in the boomlet may be the recent sales of several of Stephen Mardigans buildings on Forest Avenue. After Mardigan, who owned several properties there, including his own Avenue Auto Sales, was convicted of illegal gambling in 2019, he had to forfeit many of his real estate holdings. During a walk down Forest Avenue, headed north from Woodfords Corner, Teresa Valliere, president of the neighborhood association Friends of Woodfords Corner, pointed out several that are showing signs of new activity.

Weve been driving by the strip for at least four years, said Belleville bakery owner Chris Deutsch, who has lived in the neighborhood with his young family for almost that length of time. Its nice to see some movement there, new businesses popping in and new businesses opening up. Its certainly an up-and-coming area that has some opportunities for sure.

He said his own decision to locate on outer Forest has more to do with drastically needing a new production space, more so than the location itself. When he opened the tiny Belleville on Munjoy Hill four years ago, he was baking 75 to 100 croissants a day.

Two years later, customer demand called for 300 to 400 each day, and during the pandemic, numbers swelled to 500 to 600. Weve been making hundreds of croissants in 250 square feet, Deutsch said. Thats not a sustainable model nor does it allow us to do any more. Thats why we sell out. We physically cant make any more.

He hopes to reopen the bakery, which has been closed since May but for occasional popups, and to open the Belleville production facility with a walk-up retail window in February. Once settled on Forest Avenue, in the attractive, neatly painted shingled building he has leased, Deutsch expects to produce 1,000 pastries a day.

A 10-minute walk away is the new Speckled Ax coffee production facility, tucked into Walton Street, about a block off Forest Avenue. Although the focus is production, there is small retail sales counter with to-go cups of the distinctive wood-roasted coffee, as well as bagels from Rose Foods, which itself opened on Forest Avenue near the University of Southern Maine in 2017.

Speckled Ax had been roasting coffee for its two Portland coffee shops in South Portland in a facility near the Maine Mall. For several years, owner Matt Bolinder looked for a cheerier space, but faced stiff competition from the cannabis and beer industry. He was relieved to finally lease space on Walton Street, the former home of Izzys Cheesecake. This was perfect.

Beyond production, he sees potential to service a new part of town for folks that wanted our coffee but werent necessarily going to be heading into downtown, as well as to pilfer some of nearby Starbucks business, where he frequently observes lines of backed-up cars. Maybe, he thinks, we can service folks who would be more into our coffee. And one day, Bolinder would like to open the production facilities so the public can see where the coffee comes from.

While his rent is actually higher than he paid in South Portland, the space is much more pleasant, he said.

STOPPING TRAFFIC

Avoiding the headache of downtown and capitalizing on passing outbound traffic was very much on Pat Scallys mind when he opened the sizable Pizzaiolo Bar & Grille in July in the old (1990s) Raouls Roadside Attraction dance bar, and later a rotation of other restaurants, which had been standing empty for some five years. Also, he loves the distinctive big red building. Its my favorite building in Portland. I like the looks of it. And all the history of it. And the fact it has a parking lot, Scally said.

Scally has operated Pizzaiolo on Cumberland Avenue since 2016, selling New York-style pizza by the slice, a practice he has continued on Forest Avenue from a glass display case immediately to the right of the door. Your white pies here, red pies here, specialty pies down here, he says, pointing proudly. In the Bronx, even they dont have as many (varieties) as I do. Twenty-four different kinds. Hes expanded the menu at the bar and grill, offering chicken wings, shrimp scampi, meatball parmesan and more, and the place has live music, too.

Forest Avenue narrows to one sometimes agonizing lane for about a mile in front of Pizzaiolo. Some 19,000 to 25,000 cars a day drive by, according to state Department of Transportation studies. Woodfords Corner is the second-busiest intersection in the state. Morrills Corner is the busiest. (The citys Department of Public Works and planning office as well as the state Department of Transportation are working on redesigning Morrills Corner, based on the 2018 Portland-South Portland Smart Corridor Plan, which devoted almost 10 pages to the Woodfords Corner/Morrills Corner stretch.) Commuters may seethe, but Scally spied an opportunity.

They are sitting in traffic anyway so Ive got their attention, he said. Instead of waiting, vexed and frustrated, he thinks theyll pull in for a fast slice, or even a whole pizza (on their way home to Windham that itd still be hot when they get home), or maybe a deal on drinks and appetizers, which are priced enticingly low on weekdays from 3 to 5 p.m. By the time you are done, the traffic is gone, Scally figures.

FOR THE COMMUNITY

Qutaiba Hassoon, owner of Falafel Time, which opened in an old Papa Johns earlier this month, selling its namesake falafel as well as kebabs, pizza, baba ghanoush and more, is likewise well aware of the traffic. Between 3 and 7 p.m., the cars are bumper to bumper, he said. Consequently, his dad, who used to own Haggartys, a British-Indian-Middle Eastern eatery just a half mile away on Forest Avenue, suggested his son focus on dinner. But Hassoon noticed something else thats far harder to see on the characterless commercial stretch the neighborhood. I said, there are a lot of offices and a lot of (University of New England) students. Even lunchtime, its busy.

Sam Patel and his wife, Radhika Shah, reached a similar conclusion, mostly by accident. For 10 years, Patel has co-owned Friendly Discount Beverage with his uncle and another partner (he has since bought them out). For just as long, they have been trying and failing to get a spirits license from the state, which would allow them to compete with the nearby, well-established RSVP Discount Beverage. Last June, after Hilltop Superette on Munjoy Hill got such a license, Patel and his wife bought the store. But a funny thing happened on the way to their beverage business dreams. It turned out they enjoyed running a market.

Over last 17 and 18 weeks, it blew my mind how fun it is and how much it serves its purpose on the hill, Patel said. Its a one-stop shop, for produce, food. You can order stuff from the kitchen. We take EBT. You can get all your vices under one roof your Pringles, even your cat and dog food. It serves this huge purpose.

That got him rethinking Friendly Discount Beverage: Why are we competing with our competitors on Forest Avenue over booze? It doesnt make any sense, Patel said. Lets pivot and lets do something for that neighborhood, for the community, something that is a bit more convenient than going to Hannaford and Shaws. On that part of Forest Avenue, there isnt anything that screams, I can run across the street and get my eggs and milk and cheese.

Earlier this month, they rebranded themselves Back Bay Superette, and added items like Cabot cheese, local farm eggs, lemons, salad dressing and Shake n Bake. We still have huge selection of wine, a huge selection of beer. We never removed anything, Patel said. We added groceries and produce and to-go food, and soon coffee. The essential stuff.

He hopes to capture both the hundreds of workers in the micro-area and the commuters.

THINKING AHEAD

For now, running across outer Forest Avenue seems unimaginable, or certainly unsafe. But Nell Donaldson, director of special projects in the Portland planning department and Valliere, of Friends of Woodfords Corner, can imagine it, and they are working toward that vision. For one, Valliere pictures a street crossing where Baxter Woods abuts Forest Avenue. She imagines bump-outs, a raised road surface, and pedestrians and students regularly, and safely, crossing from Baxter Woods and the Deering Center neighborhood to get something to eat on Forest Avenue. She imagines better landscaping, improved sidewalk snow removal and businesses with attractive street-facing facades north of Woodfords Corner, all things that could encourage pedestrians and community.

That kind of idea is part of a national urban planning movement focused on the 5-minute or 10-minute neighborhood. The walkshed, Donaldson said. We hear from people all the time people want to be able to walk to a coffee shop, people want to be able to walk to buy milk. We want everybody to be in walking/biking distance of the critical things they need.

Another issue in the citys sights is affordable housing. Those are honestly two things that stretch of Forest Avenue could use some work on, she said.

She added a caution. A lot of this movement to find new places is great, Donaldson said.

But its worth remembering the well-established food businesses on outer Forest Avenue, including many owned by immigrants, that are also attracted to the area by the affordable rents.

We want to make sure we are not displacing, that we are still leaving spaces for people who cannot afford rents as they go up, Donaldson cautioned. That is the double-edged sword. That is something we are thinking about.

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Galat advice mat dijiye: Janhvi Kapoor slams paps as she stops father Boney Kapoor from taking off his mask at the airport; Watch – Bollywood Bubble10.20.21

Image Source - Instagram

Janhvi Kapoor was spotted with dad Boney Kapoor at the Mumbai airport on Tuesday when she slammed the paparazzi for giving wrong advice. As she headed for her flight, Janhvi stopped to pose for the paps along with her father Boney Kapoor. The producer was seen taking off his mask for the photographs when Janhvi stopped him and made him wear his mask again.

But the photographers were seen saying at the back, Kuch nahi hoga. When Janhvi slammed the paps and said, Hoga, aise galat advice mat dijiye. Then the father-daughter duo posed for the paps with their mask on. This video is being loved by Janhvis fans as they were all praise for the actress. They took to the comments and applauded her saying, Something sensible to do now a days!, papa ki paree, She did right, Well done janhvi .

Further in the video, Janhvi was also asked to show her new tattoo. To which the Dhadak actress said, Bohot dekh liya, maine Instagram pe daal diya.

Janhvi Kapoor has got a tattoo earlier last month that left her fans in a state of frenzy. She got herself inked with the phrase I love you my labbu. This had left the fans wondering what it all means. Janhvi had shared a picture of her tattoo with a caption that read, I love you my Labbu. You are the best Baby in the world.

Check out the video below:

Meanwhile, on the work front, Janhvi will be seen next in the movies Good Luck Jerry, Dostana 2 and Helen.

Also Read: Janhvi Kapoor looks like a timeless beauty in Manish Malhotras dreamy saree; fans call her insanely elegant

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Galat advice mat dijiye: Janhvi Kapoor slams paps as she stops father Boney Kapoor from taking off his mask at the airport; Watch - Bollywood Bubble

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Breast cancer survivors have weathered a storm – The Ellsworth American10.20.21

ELLSWORTH Cora Fahy is a breast cancer survivor, but she is apt to say she is surviving the disease. Thats because even years into remission and really for the rest of her life, a woman must cope with cancers lingering effects and the fear that it might return.

Men, too, get breast cancer (about 1 in 100 cases), but most diagnoses are in women. Many in the survivor community have found a sisterhood and a common cause raising awareness of the disease and the importance of early detection.

Fahy posts monthly social media reminders to followers to feel it on the first, a tongue-in-cheek reference to self-breast exams.

A Seal Cove resident who works as a physical therapist assistant at Northern Light Maine Coast Hospital in Ellsworth, Fahy was diagnosed with breast cancer in April 2015. She and her medical providers had long been on the lookout for signs after Fahys sister was diagnosed in 2008.

But neither mammograms, ultrasounds or breast MRIs detected Fahys cancer; it was her own eyes. She put her bra on in the morning and everything appeared fine, but by that evening a large protrusion had formed on her left breast. Then came the biopsy and the diagnosis. The following week she had the first of two lumpectomies. She went on to have four rounds of chemotherapy, a double mastectomy and reconstruction surgery, all in the course of a year.

You get the initial diagnoses but be aware youre going to have to navigate a storm, Fahy said. Cancer is not linear. Theres always going to be twists and turns.

Lily Cox, 33, of Ellsworth had many twists and turns in the nine years on and off she battled cancer. She was first diagnosed at age 20. Her type of cancer, phyllodes tumors, is extremely rare and genetic. Her grandmother, who had a mastectomy at 36, warned her to be vigilant.

So I have always checked for lumps, Cox said. When she found one it was small. It was the size of a peach when it was removed. She ultimately had five tumors removed. The largest was roughly the size of a grapefruit.

In addition to the surgeries, she underwent radiation and chemotherapy. Both working and parenting were a struggle.

She advises women to always, always, always get their routine screenings, including breast exams and pap smears. Cancer does not discriminate by age, she cautioned.

Even while in remission, many patients continue to take medications and modify their lifestyles to prevent recurrence.

Fahy will take the drug Tamoxifen, an estrogen modulator, for the next decade. Genetic testing revealed she has an ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia) mutation, which greatly increases the risk of breast cancer. Other than her sister, there was little family history of any cancer.

Fahy is originally from Galway, Ireland, but has lived in Maine for 31 years. Living alone and far from relatives, she relied heavily during treatment on her tribe.

She posted a call for help on social media shortly after being diagnosed. She was overwhelmed by the support.

Initially friends and co-workers offered shoulders to cry on and ears to listen, but countless prepared meals, check-ins and gifts followed. A Buddha statue appeared in her garden; a friends whoopie pies on the doorstep. There was a GoFundMe account to assist with costs.

Fahys brother came to visit from Ireland during her mastectomy and when it came time for him to return, he told her he was no longer worried.

He was just floored by the generosity of Mainers and the people that I had surrounded myself with, Fahy said.

As someone who works in health care, Fahy said it was a learning experience to be the one receiving care. She needed to learn to ask for help. Co-workers were ready to offer it whether she asked or not.

I wasnt a number; I was Cora, she recalls.

Waiting for appointments, she was often joined by a member of the hospitals maintenance or housekeeping staff, a receptionist or nurse. Her doctor and his wife offered to clean her house.

She focused on educating herself so she could become a better advocate for my patients and for the breast cancer community.

She now works with breast cancer patients who need lymphedema treatment and physical therapy.

Fahy also co-hosts a monthly survivors group at the Beth C. Wright Cancer Resource Center in Ellsworth. She is involved with the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and the Breast Cancer Advisory Board of the Lafayette Center. She has authored articles about her experience and has been involved in other advocacy.

Cancer has marked her life and her body, but Fahy has found empowerment in the experience. A few years ago, Town Hill tattoo artist Katie Dube tattooed flowers over the many scars on Fahys chest.

Literally when I look in the mirror, I see a work of art, not a work of cancer, Fahy said.

Cyndi is managing editor of The Ellsworth American. The Ellsworth native joined the staff of The American in 2007 as a reporter.

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The CAT Is Coming Back – 929theticket.com10.08.21

After being suspended for the third straight year, there is hope that the CAT, a high-speed ferry that travelsbetween Bar Harbor, Maine, and Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, will be back up and running in the spring of 2022.

The ferry servicehas allowed faster transport of people, pets, and vehicles via the CAT so, you can cut your travel time down if your destination is beyond Nova Scotia or Bar Harbor. What would take 7 hours by car only takes 3.5 hours via boat. The ability to move quickly between the locations allows for another choice for travel between Maine and Nova Scotia for tourists looking to hit both destinations or for Mainers and Canadians to pass through quicker.

The service has been put on hold for years due to several factors, including needed renovations for the ferry terminal and the occurrence of the pandemic.

According to the ferry's website, the money needed to run the service has also contributed to stopping service the past few years, stating: "As with air service, restarting an international ferry route requires substantial upfront investment which is impossible to recover in a very short season."

Currently, the CAT is recommending those wanting to travelutilize the Fundy Rose, which allows for travelbetween Nova Scotia, St. John, and New Brunswick.

Start planning for a quicker way to get to some of the most beautiful locations on the East Coast of North America starting in the spring of 2022.

The bustling and scenic town of Ellsworth has a lot of history, old and new and lots of experiences to have, old and new. Whether you want to take a train ride, take the kids to the park, get a sweet tattoo, treat yourself or find that after-party early morning breakfast, here are 25 businesses and locations to really get some memorable experiences at the good vibes town Downeast Maine, Ellsworth.

Take a look at how Downtown Bangor, the Waterfront, State Street, Stillwater and more areas of Bangor looked years ago compared to today using Google Street View archives.

See the Must-Drive Roads in Every State

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Check Out These 14 Incredible Pieces By Maine Tattoo Artists07.25.21

More Common Than Ever

Tattoos in various styles have been around for centuries. Tattoos in the United States were largely part of military or sailor culture and for decades were looked down upon. Today the attitudes toward tattoos have in large part changed. Many businesses have evolved and have removed anti-visible tattoos for employee handbooks and are more socially acceptable than ever.

Tattoos in pop culture certainly helped the change of public opinion with various tattoo-centric reality shows and competitions.

Even though Maine is a small state, Mainers don't have to travel to big cities like Boston, New York City, or Pittsburg for quality ink. In fact, there are some incredible shops and artists right in our backyard.

Recently we asked listeners to share photos of their ink and share about their artist. There were HUNDREDS of submissions.

The Parlor in Auburn, as well as Venom Ink Tattoo in Sanford, were posted many times and happened to make this list. And yes, because there were hundreds of entries more lists will be published in the future.

Besides two heavy tattoo hitters being a commonality in this first list, another commonality was the love of pop culture with Star Wars, Marvel, and Disney ink. (Which, technically are all Disney now, right?)

Check out our first batch of 14 tattoos from the simple fine lines, to watercolor, to portraits, and more. If you'd like to brag on your artist and share a photo you can always submit photos through our app!

Mainers came out in full force sharing their beloved tattoos from local artists This is just a small sample of the pieces and artists we received and more will be coming soon!

10 Maine Towns With Dirty Sounding Names

Here Are the 14 Times Bigfoot Has Been Reported in Maine

Kids enjoy a lot of things but for summertime fun, it all comes down to 5 groups; amusement/water parks, animals, sports, learning, and the beautiful outdoors. If you're looking for some serious family fun this summer, start checking these off your bucket list.

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Goody’s Tattoo shop opens in Orleans – Wicked Local07.25.21

Matt Rice| The Cape Codder

ORLEANS -- Adding a touch of entrepreneurial diversity todowntown Orleans, Eastham native Sean Shea has opened a first-of-its-kind tattoo shop on Main Street.

Shea, a 2003 Nauset Regional High School graduate, was officially given the green light to open his shop, Goody's Tattoo, after being issued the town's first Body Art license, and Body Art establishment license, by the Orleans Board of Health earlier this spring.

"This really is a dream come true, and something I've been working toward for awhile; I couldn't be happier," said Shea, who began working with the town to obtain thelicense more than a year ago.

"I have to say that the town, and the officials I dealt with, were great to work with and a real help. "

A unique type of license, since nothing similar has ever been issued in Orleans, Shea said the process to legally open was long, but he expected that.

"I did a bunch of research before doing anything with the town, so being prepared really helped," said Shea, who graduated from Rhode Island School of Design in 2007, before returning to the Cape soon afterward.

"I went (to RISD) for illustration, but I always had tattooing in the back of my mind," he said.

With no experience tattooing, Shea worked in a local art shop and did other odd jobs before finally breaking into the art form.

It started when he met Khristian Bennett, and his wife Andrea, from Mooncusser Tattoo and Piercing shop in Provincetown.

"I asked if he was looking for an apprentice, he said 'no' but encouraged me to come back, so I basically just showed up at the shop and never left."

After gaining experience and earning his first Body Art License in Provincetown 11 years ago, Shea spent five years tattooing at Mooncusser's before moving to Maine, to work at Tsumani Tattoo shop in Portland.

"It was a great experience, Portland was amazing, but it wasn't the Cape, it wasn't home."

Shea said it was the pandemic, and theshutdown, that helped push him to make the jump into opening his own shop in Orleans, after splitting a lot of time between Maine and the Cape.

After the location on Main Street became available last summer (at Post Office Square across from Friend's), Shea took a chance and rented the space with nothing more than an eye on the future.

"It was a chance I was taking, but I had a good feeling from the town moving forward that things would work out. They'd never issued a license like this before, but there was no reason why not, so I was confident."

At this point, just weeks after officially opening his shop, Shea is in high demand already, with appointments filled up throughthe summer and beyond. His schedule is so full that he cannot accommodate walk-ins.

Shea will continue work a limited schedule at Tsunami in Maine, while still settling in to his Orleans shop.

Appointment requests, and questions, can be emailed to seansheatattoo@gmail.com.

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‘Walking With the Trees’ artist reception at Carver Hill Gallery – PenBayPilot.com07.09.21

CAMDEN Carver Hill Gallery, 28 Bayview Street in Camden, will host a reception on Thursday, July 15, for artists Gemma Astor and Scott Troxel in a two person show Walking With the Trees. The artists will be available to meet the public and answer questions about their work. The reception will run from 5 7 p.m.

Gemma Astor works in acrylics and is called to render the tiny worlds and dark spaces of decay and rebirth found in the forest floor. Wild plants and trees have become familiar friends as she grows older and spends more time in nature, and her paintings are complex, tangled representations of the forest. Gemma operates a very lucrative tattoo business in Portland, but now resides primarily in the Rangeley area in a log cabin her husband built on Mooselookmeguntic Lake. She is a gardener and an amateur herbalist; the Maine mountains, trees, plants, and fungi are endless inspiration for her work. She put her complete focus on painting for the last 18 months to complete the work for this show.

In my large-scale botanical portraiture, I seek to alter the size relationship between plants and humans, said Astor, in a Carver news release. I want to be small in the presence of plants.The work that is coming forth is emotional, intense, and heavily rooted in devotion to Great Mother. My paintings are visual evidence of my own pursuit of coming home to her. I am drawn to the gritty, messy, life-giving, death-making cycles of existence. These pieces I am compelled to create are like love songs; they are whispers of gratitude, reverence and surrender.

Scott Troxel is a two-dimensional wood sculptor creating compelling wall art in wood and wood composite materials. He is inspired by the design andtechnology of the twentieth century, such as mid-century modernism, the Atomic Age, and art deco.

My work relies heavily on the pillars of strong composition, balance, color, form and movement, said Troxel. I then incorporate themes of aging, organic versus man-made, and new versus old in the sense of how we engage with technology, design, and aesthetics across generations.Specifically, I use the example of mid-century modern design. It has the rare ability to be timeless yet dated, modern but retro, organic and grounded but still futurist and otherworldly. I find this concept fascinating, and it is the foundation of what I try to achieve in my work. I want it to feel both modern and bold but perhaps from another erawhen it was cutting edge, before time passed it by and changed the definition of new or modern. An example of my work in this show that demonstrates this idea would be Achtung III. The piece is bold, graphic and nods to both hard-edge abstraction and post-painterly abstraction. But it is also modern and slightly distressed and grungy. The color palette was taken from a 50s book cover that has amazing design and color.

Troxels work is included in dozens of corporate and hospitality collections worldwide.

FMIwww.carverhillgallery.com or email:carverhillgallerymaine@gmail.com

Show runs throughAugust 15, 2021, open 7 days a week, Mon - Sat, from 11 a.m. 5 p.m.; Sun, 11 a.m. 4 p.m.

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30 years after Brockton woman’s murder, her case is unsolved. Her family wants answers. – Enterprise News06.29.21

BROCKTON Even though Sheanna Isabel hasn't seen her mother since she was 9 years old, she still hasvivid memories of their time together.

She remembers howCherie-Lynn Bishop loved to cook.

One of her favorite memories is when they drove around the cityin a nice carwhile listening to music and sipping from glass bottles of seltzer water.

Even when Isabellived with her father in Maine as a child, Bishop sent her cards that said, "Love you madly and miss you much."

Isabel, now 39 and a Stoughton police officer,holds on to these memories of her mother, who was murdered and whose body was found in Brockton on June 25, 1991.

Thirty years later, her case remains unsolved and Bishop's family is still holding onto the hope of learning who killed Bishop and for that person to be brought to justice.

Cherie-Lynn Bishop was born July 27, 1962 in Stoughton at the former Goddard Hospital.

Her family lived on the north side of Brockton. She was the older sister of Lisa Caine and Paul Bishop. Her mother Linda Bishop was a single mother who worked two jobs.

Cherie-Lynn Bishops maternal grandparentswere present throughout the siblings'lives and their grandfather was a father figureto them.

Each weekend, the siblings would visit their grandparents in Easton. They went to church on the weekends and their grandfather would meet them for breakfast before school.

Bishop was very kind, her family members said.

"If you needed anything she would give it to you, said her mother Linda Bishop, who is 77. She would give you the shirt off her back. She didn't have much."

She had a nice smile and liked to have a good time, enjoying activities such as camping, visiting local ponds and beachesand going to Brockton's D.W. Field Park to have cookouts.

Bishop also loved animals. When she lived in Puerto Rico in the late 1980s, a hurricane prompted her to move back to Brockton. Her family said she was sad that she couldnt bring her dog from the island with her.

Isabels parents were young when they had her. Her grandmother helped raise her and when Isabel was 9 years old shewent to live in Maine with her father.

She used to have a fear that she wouldn't make it to age 28, which is how old her mother was at her death.

Caine, her aunt,said she was sorry to hear that and wants her toknow that Bishop would be proud of her.

Her grandmother added that Bishop is watching over her and her children.

Susan Poole was a friend of Bishop's and considered her like asister.

Poole was a teenager when they met and Bishop was several years older than Poole.

Poole's home life wasn't great. One day Bishop stopped Pooles sister from hitting her, she said.From then, Bishop watched out for Poole and they were together a lot.

"I latched onto her and didn't let go and she didn't ask me to go," said Poole, who is 56.

When she was 25, Poolelived nearby Bishop, who had an apartment on Montello Street.

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She was a single mother and struggling financially. Bishop would come over every morning to wake her up and bring coffee. Bishops mother would also come over to check in on her and make sure that Poole had enough food.

In her 20s, Bishop learned she had rheumatoid arthritis and it left her in pain. She was getting medication shots for treatment, her mother said, and at times she couldn't climb the stairs.

The last night that Caine saw her sister alive, sheargued with her about wearing Caine's sneakers. She saw her sister get into a van not far from Bishop's apartment and heard her on the phone having an argument.

Bishop also spoke with her mother on the phone the night before.

The next day, aDepartment of Public Welfare caseworker who walked to work every day discovered Bishop's body in tall grass, according to Brockton police reports from 1991 that Bishops family saved.

She was found lying face down in the playgroundwearing only a pair of red socks and her hair was tied in an elastic.

Police believe Bishop was strangled because bruising marks were found on the front and back of her neck, according to police reports.

The area around the body wasnt disturbed, police reports say, but a tire track was found a short distance away in the grass.

The discovery of a body in the park was on the morning news, but Linda Bishop didn't see it. She was at work at a bank when she learned that her daughter had died. A police officer she knew showed her a picture of Cherie-Lynnand asked Linda Bishop to identify her.

Linda Bishop had to get her parents, who were then living in Wareham, to Brockton to go to the police station.

Caine was at a friend's house and police found her to break the news to her and tell her to go to the station. She didn't believe the officer when they said Bishop was dead.

Poole learned that Bishop died when a neighbor from her building said she was sorry to hear what happened to her sister. She initially didnt know if the neighbor meant her actual sister or Bishop.

Right off the bat I was in denial," Poole said.

In a 1991 Enterprise article, residents in the neighborhood near the park where Bishop's body was found claimed that the area was a place where sex workers and drug users would hangout.

In a responding article in the paper, Poole refuted the negative characterization about Cherie as someone who was involved with prostitution and drugs because of where her body was found and because police said she had a previous arrest record for two counts ofdrug possession.

"We all make mistakes," she told The Enterprise in 1991. "No one deserves to die like that and be humiliated."

Investigators haven't learned what happened to Bishop between the last time she was seen and when her body was found.

Caine remembers going out in Brockton to find answers by visiting places Bishop used to go.

"I was out there asking questions to everybody," said Caine, who is 56.

Bishop's family has suspected a couple of people from the neighborhoodmay have had something to do with her death.

One person was a friend of Bishop and liked her, but she rejected that advance, her mother said. Two of them are dead now.

Isabel said she went through investigation reports a few years ago and found that those individuals were interviewed about Bishops death, but they weren't charged.

It's easy to think that her mothers murder hasn't been solved because the police weren't doing their job, but Isabel said she understands there was a lot happening at the time, including the crack epidemic and other crime.

As a police officer herself, Isabel doesn't want to place blame on the police. She said she also doesn't want to tell investigators how to do their jobs.

"If this was my case, I kind of would be trying to look for every aspect that I can," she said.

The Plymouth County District Attorney's office said Thursday that the investigation into Bishop's unsolved homicide remains open.

District Attorney Timothy Cruz created an unsolved homicide unit to re-examineexisting evidence and conduct further investigation using modern technologies and techniques, a spokesperson said.

"Our office never forgets a victim, no matter how much time goes by," the district attorney's office said in a statement. "Every victim deserves justice and our office is committed to solving these cases, when we are able to, holding perpetrators accountable, and bringing some measure of closure to the family and friends of homicide victims."

Anyone with information about an unsolved homicide can call the office's tip line at 508-894-2584 or email PlymouthDA.UnsolvedHomicides@State.MA.US.

State Police detectives monitor the email and tip line. Information will remain confidential and contact information isn't required for a person to report information.

The family has kept in contact with investigators over the years.At first they would consistently. For a while, Isabel focused on the case a lot, but since things have fallen by the wayside on her part, she said.

"It's almost like an acceptance by now, but I don't want to accept it," she said. "It's just hard to relive again. I could do better to push things."

Poole said she has also tried over the years to learn more about what happened to Bishop.

She said she walked the railroad tracks where her friends body was found for two years. Poole said she also would follow up with investigators over the years.

"I know she wants me to look for her, Poole said. I know she wants me to help."

Now that forensics has progressed, Bishops family wants to know if those techniques could be applied to her case.

Isabel said she spoke with the former State Police trooper who worked on her mothers case about whether familial DNA searching and testing could be used.

For law enforcement investigations, familial DNA searching is the use of a DNA database and software to detect and rank potential close biological relatives, like parents, childrenand siblings, of an unknown individual whose DNA evidence investigators may have.

Law enforcement also has access to the Combined DNA Index System, which isthe FBI's criminal DNA databasesand the software to run them. It includes theNational DNA Index System to which federal, state and local forensic laboratories contribute.

Isabel said one of the peopleher family suspects was responsible for Bishop's death has siblings who could be tested.

"Having even that to be able to try could be nice, she said.

The family knows some DNA was recovered from under Bishops fingernails, but Isabel doesn't know how much is left and if it can be used for further testing.

Linda Bishop said she would like to have closure before she dies.

"The only way you're going to have closure is that they find out who did it, she said.

Family members said they would be in the courtroom every day if a trial is held.

If the person who murdered her sister is found, Caine said she would like for a picture of Bishop to be placed in the persons jail cell, so they have to look at it and think about what they did for the rest of their life.

"She never did anything to anybody to deserve that, Caine said.

She said the last words she and her sister exchanged before her death werent kind, and Caine said she blamed herself for that for years.

Poole, Bishop's friend,said her death greatly affected her, and she cant talk about her death without getting emotional.

The fact that her case has gone unsolved has left such a void in her life, Poole said.

Since Bishop died, no other friends have taken her place in making such an impact on her life, Poole said.

Im grateful for the time I knew her, she said, adding that she was grateful to have had Bishops support when she needed it.

Poole has remembered Bishop several ways since her passing, including by getting a tattoo of her friends name carved in the vine of a bittersweet plant.

At each of her homes, Poole has planted tiger lilies in Bishops honor. She places flowers in an urn at her burial site in Halifax and visits to clean off her headstone.

Isabel said what happened to her mother motivated her to become an officer.

After high school, she went into the U.S. Army as a medic. She said taking a different path was a way to avoid her feelings about what happened with her mother.

After deployments to Kosovo in 2001 and Iraq in 2006, Isabel realized that the military was not where she was meant to be. She said her heart was in criminal justice.

After her service, Isabel earned her college degree and studied criminal justice.

She joined the Stoughton Police Department in 2011 and most recently served as the school resource officer at Stoughton High School.

Isabel could have joined Brockton police in 2006, but she was deployed. She took that as a sign that working in the city wasn't the best for her.

She said it drives members of her department crazy when she writeslong and in-depth police reports. But Isabel said she does it because she understands what happens if that kind of care isn't taken.

When you don't write down the things that seem insignificant at the time or that you don't understand at the time, I add them to my report, she said. I'm putting everything in here because I know what it's like (when things are left out.)"

Isabel also follows up with families who have experienced a tragic event. It's about being patient and showing compassion, she said.

Even with cases where someone doesn't make good decisions, whether that includes drug use or mental health issues, the goal is to treat them and their families as humans with respect, Isabel said.

On the anniversary of her mothers death, Isabel takesthe day off from work to have time to reflect.Talking about her mother is difficult, but it's something she pushes herself to do.

Isabel talks to her children about her mother andabout what she looked like and has shown them pictures. They're a little young to understand what happened.

Isabel said there are people who may know something who live in the area who lived in Brockton at the time her mother died. She wants to encourage them to come forward. They may have been hesitant to do so before or scared, but they might feel stronger to do that now.

"Without that, we're still here, she said.

Staff writer Mina Corpuz can be reached by email at mcorpuz@enterprisenews.com. You can follow her on Twitter @mlcorpuz. Support local journalismby purchasing a digital or print subscription to The Enterprise today.

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30 years after Brockton woman's murder, her case is unsolved. Her family wants answers. - Enterprise News

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Check Out These 14 Incredible Pieces By Maine Tattoo Artists – q961.com06.12.21

More Common Than Ever

Tattoos in various styles have been around for centuries. Tattoos in the United States were largely part of military or sailor culture and for decades were looked down upon. Today the attitudes toward tattoos have in large part changed. Many businesses have evolved and have removed anti-visible tattoos for employee handbooks and are more socially acceptable than ever.

Tattoos in pop culture certainly helped the change of public opinion with various tattoo-centric reality shows and competitions.

Even though Maine is a small state, Mainers don't have to travel to big cities like Boston, New York City, or Pittsburg for quality ink. In fact, there are some incredible shops and artists right in our backyard.

Recently we asked listeners to share photos of their ink and share about their artist. There were HUNDREDS of submissions.

The Parlor in Auburn, as well as Venom Ink Tattoo in Sanford, were posted many times and happened to make this list. And yes, because there were hundreds of entries more lists will be published in the future.

Besides two heavy tattoo hitters being a commonality in this first list, another commonality was the love of pop culture with Star Wars, Marvel, and Disney ink. (Which, technically are all Disney now, right?)

Check out our first batch of 14 tattoos from the simple fine lines, to watercolor, to portraits, and more. If you'd like to brag on your artist and share a photo you can always submit photos through our app!

Mainers came out in full force sharing their beloved tattoos from local artists This is just a small sample of the pieces and artists we received and more will be coming soon!

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Kids enjoy a lot of things but for summertime fun, it all comes down to 5 groups; amusement/water parks, animals, sports, learning, and the beautiful outdoors. If you're looking for some serious family fun this summer, start checking these off your bucket list.

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Check Out These 14 Incredible Pieces By Maine Tattoo Artists - q961.com

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