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Friday, November 6: Main Streets and Back Roads of The Upper Valley – WCVB Boston10.31.20

Friday, November 6: Main Streets and Back Roads of The Upper Valley

ed Reinstein is headed to the Upper Valley, right along where the Connecticut River divides New Hampshire from Vermont.

Updated: 2:35 PM EDT Oct 30, 2020

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the Upper Valley is, Ah, good place to get lost. A patchwork of classic village greens stitched together with covered bridges, it's a pretty piece of country that hugs both the Vermont and New Hampshire sides of the Connecticut River, its center of gravity lively Hanover, New Hampshire Home of Dartmouth College. One of the attractions of life here in the Upper Valley is it's easy blend of rural beauty and cultural sophistication. But anytime civilization comes up against the wilderness, things can get a little hairy. Every evening, Ben Killam makes his way to a remote mountain clearing in Lime, New Hampshire, a family visit of sorts, expertise, relatives and non relatives, daughters and granddaughters. Soon, large dark masses begin appearing in the forest. A tree in a few minutes were surrounded by a dozen adult black bears and their cubs. They'll be bears coming beside you right there. Kill him, has been studying these bears for 25 years. He knows most of them by sight. That's quirky great granddaughter, and they know him. A good girl. You're good curve, mhm

Friday, November 6: Main Streets and Back Roads of The Upper Valley

ed Reinstein is headed to the Upper Valley, right along where the Connecticut River divides New Hampshire from Vermont.

Updated: 2:35 PM EDT Oct 30, 2020

Tonight, Ted Reinstein is headed to the Upper Valley, right along where the Connecticut River divides New Hampshire from Vermont. There he finds Ben Kilham, who presides over a remarkable compound where hes been studying black bears for 25 years. Ted also takes us to Lebanon, where a former New England Patriots lineman is following his post-football passions: music and tattoo art. Plus, he finds international tastes at Hanover shops offering Brazilian chocolate and Sicilian inspired gelato; meets an angel who opens his home to Appalachian Trail hikers; and crosses over into Vermont to discover a den of dinosaurs.

Tonight, Ted Reinstein is headed to the Upper Valley, right along where the Connecticut River divides New Hampshire from Vermont. There he finds Ben Kilham, who presides over a remarkable compound where hes been studying black bears for 25 years. Ted also takes us to Lebanon, where a former New England Patriots lineman is following his post-football passions: music and tattoo art. Plus, he finds international tastes at Hanover shops offering Brazilian chocolate and Sicilian inspired gelato; meets an angel who opens his home to Appalachian Trail hikers; and crosses over into Vermont to discover a den of dinosaurs.

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Halloween 2020: Trick-or-treating still on, but county recommends precautions – Journal & Courier10.29.20

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Trick-or-treaters make their way through Highland Park on Halloween, in Lafayette, on Wednesday, October 31, 2012.(Photo: Brent Drinkut)

LAFAYETTEEven with rising cases of coronavirus in Tippecanoe County, some places are determined to provide a fun and memorable trick-or-treating experience for children, as safely as they can.

In Lafayette and West Lafayette, trick-or-treating is still on this year. Some cities around the state, including Indianapolis, have advised against traditional trick-or-treating, butthe cities of Lafayette and West Lafayette do not normally impose formal trick or treating hours or an age limit for participation and are encouraging people to listen to local and CDC guidelines.

Krist Karloff, ownerof Evil Genius Tattoo in downtown Lafayette, is planning to distribute individual bags of candy to children on Halloween. Each bag will be prepared by the shops staff, wearing masks and gloves, in a sanitized station. Staff will makeefforts to minimize contact and maintain social distancing.

The goodie bags will contain candy, temporary tattoos and a sanitizing wipe and will be passed out at the shop, 420 Main St., from 4 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31.

Earlier in October during a weekly coronavirus briefing, Indiana State Health Commissioner Dr. Kristina Box gave several recommendations for people to follow for Halloween activities, based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDCs guidance for trick or treating and other Halloween-themed activities during the pandemic is separated into low, moderate and higher-risk activities.

Lower risk activities include carving or decorating pumpkins with members of your household, decorating your living space and virtual Halloween costume contests. It classifies trick-or-treating with individually wrapped goodie bags, visiting pumpkin patches or orchards and costume parades as moderate risk. Traditional trick-or-treating, indoor costume parties and indoor haunted houses are classified as a high risk.

Some Greater Lafayette Halloween annual attractions are open this year, including Evil on Erie, a haunted house on Lafayette's Erie Street. According to Evil on Erie's Facebook page, masksare required at all times, hand sanitizer is required before enteringandtemperatures are taken prior to getting tickets.

During a county health department briefing Sept. 23, Dr. Jeremy Adler, Tippecanoe County health officer, said his guidelines and advice for Halloween will be similar to what the CDC advised.

The guidance is very consistent with the same sort of approach weve taken toward other community events, Adler said.

Among those:

Instead of a traditional trunk or treat, the Tippecanoe County 4-H is holding a drive-thru event Oct. 31 for children in grades K-12 in the parking lot Lafayette Jefferson High School, 1801 S. 18th St.The 4-H drive thru will last from 10 a.m. to noon, and children and their families can receive candy, take home activities and 4-H information.

Heres what other cities surrounding Greater Lafayette and Tippecanoe County plan to do this year:

Battle Ground:Battle Ground's town website has trick-or-treating hours listed as 6-9 p.m. Oct. 31.

Crawfordsville:The citys board of works and public safety set trick-or-treating hours from 5-8 p.m. Oct. 31. Apost on the citys Facebook pageemphasized that the decision to participate or not participate should be made by parents based on their own individual comfort level. The same goes with the decision to participate or not participate in handingout treats. Those wishing to participate in handing out candy should turn on their outside lights, and those not participating should leave their outside lights off.

Delphi:The citys official trick-or-treating day will be held 6-8 p.m. Oct. 30. Those wishing to participate in handing out candy should leave their porch lights on. The Carroll County Health Department is recommending treats to be individually wrapped and masks to be worn by everyone.

Frankfort:Trick-or-treating will be held 6-8 p.m. Oct. 31. Any homeowner interested in participating is asked to leave their outside lights on.

Monticello:Monticello will hold trick-or-treating 6-8 p.m. Oct. 31 for those that wish to participate.The Streets of Monticello Association will host a trunk or treat event 3-5 p.m. Oct. 31.

Emily DeLetter is a news reporter for the Journal & Courier. Contact her at (765) 201-8515 or via email at edeletter@jconline.com. Follow her on Twitter at @EmilyDeLetter.

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Your European Vacation Was Canceled. How About a Bavarian Village in the Appalachians? – The Wall Street Journal10.29.20

HELEN, Ga.Nita Decker, who has a cabin-rental business in this faux-Bavarian tourist destination in the North Georgia mountains, is the busiest she has ever been.

We never saw it coming, she said. We cant keep up with the laundry.

When the pandemic hit, Ms. Decker had to cope with dozens of cancellations and employees unwilling to work because of concerns about contracting Covid-19. But after Georgia allowed many businesses to reopen, couples and families from Atlanta and surrounding citieslooking for vacations away from crowdspoured into the area. Now Ms. Decker is booking cabins months in advance. Not only did she retain her 21 employees, but she also gave them bonuses, she said.

Overall, the coronavirus has curtailed travel throughout the U.S., with people avoiding dense cities, amusement parks and other destinations. Most business travel has been canceled. But some areas with the magic formulaa short drive from large metro areas with a lot of outdoor activities and few crowdshave seen a surge in business as the pandemic has shut down other vacation options.

Conventions in Atlanta have been canceled. Hotels and restaurants in Savannah, Ga., have struggled, and the cruise business there has been crippled. Delta Air Lines Inc., based in Atlanta, has lost billions.

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Japan ink: Growing tribe proudly defies tattoo taboo and hopes for Olympic boost – The Japan Times10.28.20

Shodai Horiren got her first tattoo as a lark on a trip to Australia nearly three decades ago. Now, tattooed head to foot, even on her shaven scalp, she is one of Japans most renowned traditional tattoo artists.

Your house gets old, your parents die, you break up with a lover, kids grow and go, said Horiren, 52, at her studio just north of Tokyo.

But a tattoo is with you until youre cremated and in your grave. Thats the appeal.

Horiren belongs to a proud, growing tribe of Japanese ink aficionados who defy deeply rooted taboos associating tattoos with crime, turning their skin into vivid palettes of color with elaborate full-body designs, often featuring characters from traditional legends.

Banned from spas, hot spring resorts, some beaches and many gyms and pools, the enthusiasts hope the presence of tattooed foreign athletes at last years Rugby World Cup and next years Tokyo Olympic Games postponed a year due to the coronavirus pandemic will help sweep away suspicion.

If you watch the All Blacks do the haka with all their tattoos, it makes your heart beat faster, said Horiren, referring to New Zealands national rugby team and their pre-game ceremony.

Basketball players are really stylish, too. But here, even boxers cover up with foundation.

Tattoo artist Shodai Horiren, 52, tattoos customer Rie Yoshiharas back at her studio in Warabi, Saitama Prefecture, on Sept. 4. | REUTERS

Tattoos have been linked to criminals for as long as 400 years, most recently to yakuza gang members, whose full-body ink-work stops short of hands and neck, allowing concealment under regular clothes.

The popularity of Western rock music, though, with musicians increasingly sporting tattoos, has eaten away at this bias.

A court decision last year that tattoos were for decoration, and were not medical procedures, helped clarify their murky legal status and may signal a shift in attitude perhaps leading the industry to regulate itself, giving it a more mainstream image.

Referring to them as tattoos rather than irezumi literally meaning inserting ink as is becoming more common, may also help give them a stylish, fashionable veneer.

Some people get tattoos for deep reasons, but I do it because theyre cute, the same way I might buy a nice blouse, said Mari Okasaka, 48, a part-time worker who got her first tattoo at 28. Her 24-year-old son, Tenji, is working toward having his whole body covered in ink and color.

Tattoo devotees are edging into the open as well, meeting at large parties to bare and share their designs.

We may have tattoos but we are happy and bright people, said party organizer and scrapyard worker Hiroyuki Nemoto.

People with tattoos gather together for group photos at the annual gathering of the Irezumi Aikokai (Tattoo Lovers Association) in Tokyo in February. | REUTERS

Surfer and TV set-maker Takashi Mikajiri, though, is still stopped on some beaches and ordered to cover up.

Rie Yoshihara, who works in a shop dressing tourists in kimonos, said her shocked father has still not seen her full back tattoo, while Okasaka wears long sleeves to take out the garbage so her neighbors wont talk.

In America, if you have a tattoo, people dont really care. Theres not really any reaction, said Mikajiri.

Thats the ideal. Itd be really good to just be taken for granted.

Scrap yard worker Hiroyuki Nemoto, 48, wears a traditional Japanese loincloth as he poses for a photo with his 1-year-old daughter, Tsumugi, at their house in Hitachinaka, Ibaraki Prefecture, in January. | REUTERSAuthor Hiroki Takamura, 62, shows off tattoos on his palms at the annual gathering of the Irezumi Aikokai (Tattoo Lovers Association) in Tokyo in February. | REUTERSBookkeeper Mina Yoshimura, 40, who works at her husband Hiroshi Yoshimuras company, touches a new tattoo that he got the same day, at their home in Tokyo on Oct. 2. | REUTERSTattoo artist Shodai Horiren, 52, tattoos customer Rie Yoshihara at her studio in Warabi, Saitama Prefecture, on Sept. 4. | REUTERSMari Okasaka, 48, and her son Tenji Okasaka, 24, pose for photographs at their home in Niiza, Saitama Prefecture, on Sept. 25. | REUTERS

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Tattoo artist has nose CUT OFF and horns added to make himself look like Marvel villain Red Skull – The Sun10.28.20

A TATTOO artist has had his nose CUT OFF and horns added to his head to make himself look like Marvel's Red Skull.

Galicia-based tattoo artist Henry Rodriguez underwent 15 painful surgeries, including a partial nose amputation, to make himself look like the evil Marvel villain.

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Rodriguez has no regrets about his augmentations- as long as his seven-year-old son keeps calling him "super daddy".

The 34-year-old decided to completely change his life in 2012 by changing his looks to emulate the first Captain America super villain.

He said that he consulted a specialist doctor to work out what body modifications he would need back in 2011.

He added: We wanted to do something unique. The first big idea was a skull and when my doctor showed me the drafts I just saw Red Skull all over it.

It was a life project that we were considering and planning for many years, he said, adding that there were multiple stages needed to get his desired look.

The first step was to get his eyeballs blackened - and since then Rodriguez has undergone 15 surgeries that have cost him around 27,255.

His surgeries include the amputation of his nose and earlobes, and silicone implants in his forehead, cheeks and eyebrows.

He also added a few different body transformations to move away from the classic Red Skull image and give his new persona a little more individuality.

He admits that all the surgeries were painful, but said that the pain is part of chasing his dream.

It is a passion. It is like running - without pain there is no gain. It is part of the attraction.

Rodriguez underwent his transformations without the knowledge of his family back in Venezuela.

About a year ago he decided to leave Venezuela to move to Ourense, in the northwestern Spanish region of Galicia to work in a tattoo shop called Bonshyo.

He said: I never warned my family in advance about my modifications. Every time they saw me they were surprised about all the new things on me.

At first the social and visual impact was shocking to them, he said but he added that they got used to his new looks very easily.

His young son, who Rodriguez is hoping to bring over to Spain soon, really likes it. He said: My seven-year-old son always tells me I am his super daddy.

When asked how he would respond to his child wanting to follow a similar journey, he said: I would tell him that he should think about it properly and wait until he is no longer underage.

"That he should be careful not to follow an impulse. If he still decides to go through with it, I will support him and make sure that he is sent to a professional.

Looking at pictures of himself from 11 years ago, before his modifications began, he said he doesnt see himself now as any different to who he was before.

It is as if you have a breast surgery. What you have done is an aesthetic change, but it is not personal, the human being is always going to be the same.

Kids are usually surprised when they see me for the first time, but they all recognise who the character is and they seem to like it more than the adults.

Everyone reacts differently - there are reactions on people that make me laugh, but as with everything in life there are two sides to the same coin - there are the ones who agree with you and the ones who do not like you.

But ultimately I live for this and I have a lot of people supporting me and what I am doing does not make me a better or worse person.

Despite his appearance, Rodriguez says his days are fairly normal and his life at the tattoo shop fits well with his look.

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Rodriguez' manager, Carlos Rodriguez, 56, said he has the perfect manners and polite character of the real Red Skull.

Rodriguez has more modifications planned, he said, but for now, he is keeping them a secret, as he wants them to be a surprise.

Aside from working at the tattoo shop, he is hoping that the festivals, tattoo conventions and body art transformation fairs will be open soon so he can fill his schedule and bring his son over.

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Keeping warm with the help of the Satanic Temple – KENS5.com10.28.20

Members of the temple's San Antonio chapter are collecting warm clothes for the homeless.

SAN ANTONIO As temperatures begin to drop, theres a little bin of warmth in the front of Master Minds Tattoo Shop. As part of its first-ever "Cozy 4 Baphy" donation campaign, the Satanic Temple San Antonio Chapter is asking for donations of warm clothes, hand sanitizer and personal hygiene products.

We get donations in and I think our bin is full every week for pickups, said Dehlia Vance, manager of the tattoo shop. Weve been getting a good response from the community to help on out.

The Satanic Temple is a non-theistic religion, which means its members dont believe in a devil or the supernatural, but instead use the image of Satan to symbolize resistance against tyranny. Baphy refers to a monument of Baphomet associated with the temple.

Collecting warm clothes to help the homeless make it through the winter lines up with the first of the temple's seven fundamental tenets.

One should strive to act in compassion and empathy to all creatures within reason, said Attar BAlam, a spokesperson for the Satanic Temple San Antonio.

Balam says that coronavirus concerns may make the need greater this year.

We figured a lot of displaced members of our society would not want to seek shelter because they have limited access to health care and being cramped up in shelters like that would just expose them to more, he said.

Though not affiliated with the temple itself, Master Minds is one of many San Antonio businesses helping to collect donations.

It doesnt matter what religion you believe in or any of that stuff, said Master Minds Owner Kika Blunt. As long as youre helping out people, thats whats important. Thats what were doing.

Information on the Cozy 4 Baphy clothing drive is available on the Satanic Temple San Antonios Facebook page.

Donations can be dropped off at the following locations:

Some of the tattoo shops accept donations by appointment only. There is also an Amazon wish list that can be used to contribute.

You can learn more about the Satanic Temple San Antonio on itswebsite.

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Panacea Tattoo Removal Offers a Second Chance with Laser Tattoo Removal Featuring the Astanza Duality in Grand Junction, CO – PRNewswire10.28.20

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo., Oct. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Panacea Tattoo Removal, an up-and-coming laser tattoo removal business in Grand Junction, Colorado, is giving people a fresh start with laser tattoo removal using the Astanza Duality laser. Panacea Tattoo Removal is a judgment-free clinic that specializes in removing unwanted tattoos no matter the motivation for removal. They provide complete tattoo removal, selective tattoo removal, fading existing ink in preparation for a cover-up tattoo, and facial services.

"I've owned tattoo shops for eight years and worked as an experienced laser technician and esthetician for five. There's nothing more rewarding than helping someone feel happy and confident in their skin. Hence the name Panacea Tattoo Removal, named after the goddess of remedy. My aim with this business is to help remove tattoo regret and ultimately remedy the unwanted ink people no longer desire," said Brieanna Calandrella, owner. "I knew if I was going make Panacea Tattoo Removal a reality, I would need a laser that could perform to the high standards that I set for my business. The Astanza Duality has exceeded my expectations and I'm so excited to deliver the best tattoo removal results in Grand Junction with this cutting-edge laser."

Panacea Tattoo Removal has invested in the Astanza Duality Q-switched Nd:YAG laser to perform all treatments. This powerful laser system is trusted by leading tattoo removal practices worldwide thanks to its reliability and power. The Duality produces 1064 nm and 532 nm wavelengths which target a wide variety of popular ink pigments and are safe to use on all skin types, even darker skin tones. The Duality's ultra-short pulse duration and high pulse energy create intense peak power for optimal ink shattering and faster tattoo fading.

"Brieanna is a true tattoo removal expert who is extremely knowledgeable about the procedure and equally as passionate," said Opal Taskila, Astanza Account Manager. "Her dedication to great results and patient care coupled with the Duality laser is sure to make Panacea Tattoo Removal the #1 destination for removing unwanted ink in the greater Grand Junction area."

In celebration of their grand opening, Panacea Tattoo Removal is offering first-time clients 20% off tattoo removal treatment packages and $20 off initial dermaplaning appointments for the month of November.

ABOUT PANACEA TATTOO REMOVAL

Panacea Tattoo Removal is a laser tattoo removal focused practice in Grand Junction, Colorado. They specialize in removing unwanted tattoos and also offer facial services including dermaplaning. Treatments are performed by Brieanna Calandrella, master esthetician and laser technician, and medically supervised by Dr. Paula Marchionda MD, MPH, BSN.

Panacea Tattoo Removal offers free tattoo assessments and consultations. To book a consultation, call (970) 361-5166 or visit https://www.panaceatattooremoval.com/. Panacea Tattoo Removal is located at 624 Rae Lynn St. #B STE 102, Grand Junction, CO 81505.

ABOUT ASTANZA LASER

Astanza is the leader in lasers for tattoo removal, hair removal, and additional aesthetic procedures. In addition to delivering cutting-edge medical laser devices such as the Duality, Trinity, MeDioStar, and DermaBlate systems, Astanza offers its customers a complete range of training, marketing, and business consulting services specific to achieving success in this growing field.

Astanza Laser is headquartered inDallas, TX,with customers throughoutNorth AmericaandEurope. For product, investor, or press information, call (800) 364-9010, or visithttps://astanzalaser.com/.

SOURCE Astanza Laser

http://www.AstanzaLaser.com

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Heres what its like to get a tattoo during the coronavirus pandemic – Houston Chronicle10.23.20

Somewhere in Wyoming while riding in the passenger seat of a Subaru Outback, I decided to get a vacation tattoo.

I know, I know. A tattoo? In the coronavirus pandemic?

For me, the key to a decision like this was calculating and managing the risk factors to decide how to keep myself and the people in my pandemic bubble as safe as possible.

Only one of the seven tattoos I currently have was planned. The others, like all the best things in life, were spontaneous, or I was bored that day.

Eight years ago, I was fired from being an assistant for not being the right fit. The next day, I had a blue heart tattoo on my back. In 2018, I was hanging with friends in Austin when one said she was too scared to get tattooed alone. Now, I have a thick outline of my Jeep, Lucille, on my left arm. Last Thanksgiving, I was so jazzed after watching Knives Out that I decided to get a jellyfish tattoo, signifying resiliency.

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For this newest tattoo, the strong feeling was 2020, pandemic-induced depression and a need for normalcy. And the only therapy I knew would work, even if it was only temporary, was a date with a tattooing needle.

My friend and I both tested negative for COVID-19 in the days before our cross-country road trip. Over the course of four days, we drove through New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana and Idaho before arriving at our destination in Spokane, Wash.

We were masked at every stop from Cadillac Ranch in Amarillo to a buffalo sighting at Yellowstone National Park. In every hotel, we wore masks and sanitized our hands frequently in the lobbies, elevators and hallways. We called in to-go orders at restaurants and stayed distant from other people and their dogs at dog parks.

By the time we made it to Spokane, I was ready to explore the city and find an artist who would tattoo a monarch butterfly on my left tricep. It was another small piece of what will eventually be an incoherent, but interesting, sleeve of tattoos.

I found a shop with experienced artists who all had their own style. When we arrived, the doors were locked and a sign read: Knock hard for service. We knocked, and a masked tattoo apprentice opened the door and asked that we use hand sanitizer before he sent out an artist to meet us in the foyer.

The artist, Royale, scheduled a 1 p.m. appointment for the following day; he laid down their COVID-19 safety precautions, which included masks, hand-washing, and the allowed number of people in the shop at any given time. I estimated the appointment would require at least two hours.

Full disclosure: the artist did not wear a mask for the entire appointment. But I did.

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We shared limited contact tracing information, which means he told me that he is masked at all times in public and I told him about our trip and my general pandemic principles.

The tattoo process is different for everyone; some people love the way they look, but hate the pain. I, on the other hand, appreciate the feeling of a needle on my skin and trading stories and memories with the artist.

This time, the proximity of another human is what made the experience enjoyable. It reminded me how much I missed the feeling of closeness with strangers at the mall, in an airport, in a mosh pit because of necessary social distancing and isolation.

I learned that he had been tattooing for more than 20 years, and lived through the worst of the tattoo trends: culturally-appropriated kanji symbols, barbed wire, lower-back stamps and phrases in Old English. The current trend is neck and hand tattoos for 18-year-old suburban kids, he told me with an annoyed smirk.

The butterfly was bloody and irritated when he was finished, but he packaged the fresh ink with surgery tape to keep it from scabbing and flaking. I tipped him well, thanked him for the laughs and walked out.

When I returned to Houston, I scheduled an appointment for another COVID-19 test. I had no symptoms, but knew that I could still be infected given my travels.

It came back negative. And the butterfly is stunning.

julie.garcia@chron.com

Twitter.com/reporterjulie

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COPING WITH COVID: Small businesses find ways to thrive – Effingham Daily News10.23.20

Prima Torbeck had only been in business a few months when the coronavirus pandemic put lives and businesses to a screeching halt.

Torbeck owns Heartland Health Food Store in Effingham. She bought the business last year and reopened it that November.

As an essential business, Torbeck kept her doors open but admits opening a business before a pandemic is tough. The unprecedented circumstance changed the way people shopped in her small specialty store. Rather than spending more time in the store perusing the aisles, customers were shortening their shopping trips.

People's priorities shifted. They went from shopping whole store to just wanting one item, she said.

Their habits changed also, according to Torbeck. Torbeck had stocked her store with an alternative coffee creamer before the pandemic. Then drinking habits changed as people were either off work or working remotely, and drinking less coffee than they normally would working at the office or during a commute.

People's work habits, daily routines changed, she said.

Torbeck suddenly found herself with inventory that wasn't selling.

My business took hit big time, she said.

On the other hand, as consumers looked to boost their immune systems and live healthier lifestyles in an effort to stave off the virus, Torbeck experienced a boost in sales of vitamins and supplements. However, her other inventory of hard-to-find healthy food items weren't flying off the shelves.

Torbeck says her Effingham store is unique.

We have a lot of really cool stuff you have to go to big cities to get. We have such a big allergen section. It's all here under one roof, she said.

In addition to moving inventory, Torbeck was also struggling with keeping employees.

So, she applied for and received money from the Paycheck Protection Program, which Congress approved to provide aid to small businesses. The program has provided $520 billion for 5 million businesses, most of them small. While the lifeline allowed her to maintain two part-time employees, the restrictions prevented her from purchasing much-needed items for the store, such as a new commercial blender to make the smoothies she sells. Still, Torbeck is grateful for the program despite its limitations.

It was a stopgap. It was a good short-term fix, she said.

Sales at the store have been declining since June, when Torbeck said she had a steady flow of business.

Torbeck has tried new marketing strategies to draw customers. She hosted Farmers Market vendors at the store before the market's delayed opening in downtown Effingham.

Torbeck also found a way to draw out-of-towners and interstate traffic as people began to travel more. Google Street View allows customers to take a virtual tour of her store and the service has drawn RVers, she said. She also had worked on the store's website and got a newsletter going.

We're constantly trying to come up with stuff, she said.

But as Torbeck closes in on the one-year anniversary of her store in November, she is still not sure what the future holds. Torbeck received a Small Business Association relief loan and will have to start paying it back this month. She said more PPP money would help as Congress continues to stall on another stimulus package.

Torbeck considers it a success that her business is still open when others have closed or are closing,

I know if we had to close down during the lockdown, I wouldn't be open today, she said.

JoAnn Dittamore had to apply for a PPP loan when her 20-year-old business was forced to close its doors during the statewide shutdown. The federal money allowed Dittamore to keep three part-time employees at her Effingham store, Country Peddlers. The money also helped cover rent that amounted to thousands of dollars a month.

Pictured at Country Peddlers, from left, are Lainee Stewart, RyLee Dittamore, Isley Martin, JoAnn Dittamore and JoLene Fulk.

The closure also forced Dittamore to look at other avenues to sell the plethora of antique and craft items that has expanded to clothing boutiques in more recent years.

Dittamore turned to a new marketing medium Facebook Live. Employees had dabbled in the platform before the pandemic, but ramped up promoting items on it when they could no longer do so in person. Dittamore credits the strategy for keeping the business going and keeping it solvent. It also helped reach a new group of customers out-of-towners.

Dittamore said business has been good. She attributes that partly to flea market events the business started a couple of years ago and picked back up after COVID restrictions eased.

Pictured at Country Peddlers are JoLene Fulk, JoAnn Dittamore and RyLee Dittamore.

Our flea market has helped a lot. People were so ready to get out and do something, she said.

Jason Hendrix and Nicki Asberry opened their Effingham business, Broughton Tattoo Co., on Oct. 1.

Broughton Tattoo Co. owner Jason Hendrix poses at the new Effingham shop recently.

Hendrix was able to open the Effingham shop without loans, and the artists who work there are independent contractors. Hendrix is part of a trend of small businesses serving a niche market that are opening for the first time during the pandemic. Square, a company that helps companies process credit card payments, said one in three of its new clients in the second quarter of 2020 were new businesses.

Hendrix is no stranger to opening a business. He is the owner of Mouse Town Tattoo in Mount Vernon.

Still, when asked if he had any reservation about opening a new business during a pandemic, that depended on when during the pandemic the question was asked.

If you would've asked me during shutdown, I was more worried, he said.

But after reopening his other shop, any doubt Hendrix may have had about timing quickly dissipated.

When we opened, it was insanely busy, he said. We added two other tattoos and another piercer at other shop and were still busy.

Hendrix said the decision to open a business now arose out of a need in the area for tattoo artists to have a shop to work out of locally. As Effingham has grown, so has the clientele.

The guys here have a solid clientele, he said.

Traditionally, Hendrix said the busiest time for his Mount Vernon shop has been tax season, so when the Mount Vernon shop reopened, it was like tax season.

I think anytime people get their taxes back it's the busiest time of year. Stimulus I think helps, he said.

Hendrix is not sure how long the artists will stay busy, noting November is usually the slower season. But he isn't worried.

I don't know how it will work this year, but we plan for all that. We'll be able to survive all that, he said.

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COPING WITH COVID: Small businesses find ways to thrive - Effingham Daily News

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California tattoo, piercing shops to reopen indoors with modifications – 10News10.23.20

(KGTV) California updated its reopening guidance this week to allow all personal care services to open with indoor modifications during the pandemic.

The updated guidance allows personal care services including:

(California's reopening guidance and restrictions for these businesses can be found here.)

The services may reopen in counties, including those listed in the state's first reopening tier (widespread/purple), with indoor modifications that "create a lower risk environment for employees and the public," according to a state release.

RELATED: California theme park leaders call reopening guidance unreasonable

The California Department of Public Health says evidence has shown that the risk in the newly added businesses can be "sufficiently mitigated with modifications to allow those services to resume."

"As parts of the world and much of this nation are experiencing another wave of COVID-19 cases, its more important than ever we take this disease seriously," said Dr. Erica Pan, Interim State Public Health Officer. Our Blueprint for a Safer Economy is driven by science to keep the risk of COVID-19 transmission low in order to help keep Californians safe while allowing for a safer reopening of our activities. Our approach and pace intend to avoid the difficulties that result from repeatedly opening and shutting down economic activity and tries to balance the level of a myriad of activities and economic areas that are important to all of us. The most important things all Californians can do to reduce COVID-19 transmission are masking, keeping physical distance and avoiding mixing when possible.

The update was announced a day prior to the state releasing reopening guidance for theme parks to resume operations for certain tiers during the pandemic.

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California tattoo, piercing shops to reopen indoors with modifications - 10News

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